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In other words, why does the compiler complain about things like this:

class Integer {
  int i = 3;
};

Although this is a really silly example, there are many cases in which classes have members which can be by default initialized to some value (for example some internal counter which always is default initialized to zero). What is the reason for forbidding these default initializations outside of the class constructors?

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6  
That's fine in C++11. The term to search is "in-class member initialization". –  chris Aug 23 '12 at 18:44
3  
Because the C++ language committee didn't decide to add that feature? –  Adam Rosenfield Aug 23 '12 at 18:44
9  
@Adam : Well, they did decide to, only 13 years later than we would have liked. :-P –  ildjarn Aug 23 '12 at 18:45
2  
@paulsm4 I don't see how in-class member initializers take that away. –  bames53 Aug 23 '12 at 18:56
2  
in-class initialization does not change invariant conditions, it's just a nicer way to set those conditions across many many constructors, without the overhead of having to call out to an init() function from each and every one. –  bstamour Aug 23 '12 at 19:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

As said in the comments, in C++11 you actually can do it like you showed. It's still illegal in C++98/C++03 however.

Edit: To answer your question however: I don't know :p maybe the language designers didn't think anyone would want to do that at the time of publishing C++98. In any case you certainly can do it now with C++11.

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Because there are constructors.

class InTeGeR
{
    Public:
           int i;
           InTeGeR()
            {
                i=3;
            }
 }

In presence of out-constructor initialization:

class InTeGeR
{
    Public:
           int i=3;
           InTeGeR()
            {
                i=5;
            }
            //now, i could be 3 or 5. Which one? 
            int j=i+1;
            //is j 4 or 6? Very confusing
 }
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6  
Well, InTeGeR() : i(3) {} would probably make a better example of doing it through constructor. –  AndreyT Aug 23 '12 at 18:53
    
@AndreyT: yes, you are right. There are many ways. –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Aug 23 '12 at 18:53
    
The difference is that Andrey's encompasses all of yours, as well as const and reference members, and doesn't do any unnecessary extra initialization. There's no downside at all. –  chris Aug 23 '12 at 18:55
    
The author already knows that constructors exist. The question was why can't it be done outside of constructors. –  bstamour Aug 23 '12 at 19:00
1  
@tuğrulbüyükışık: Actually if a class has lots of different types of constructors and one member of the class is some sort of counter which should be initialized to zero, I am forced to initialize it on all of the constructors. It would be nice to be able to avoid this if I wanted (although I would agree with you the code would not be as nice as the one which explicitly initializes everything at the constructors). –  user1607425 Aug 23 '12 at 19:14

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