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I'm working on a Windows Forms app and I'm wanting to remove the close button from the top. I'm aware of the ControlBox option, but I'm wanting to provide a help button. Is there a way to have the Close button not visible while maintaining the help button?

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3  
Why would you be so mean to your users? What if they want to close the form? –  Servy Aug 23 '12 at 18:57
    
It will be a time clock for our shop employees....I don't want them to be able to close the software... –  Jared Aug 23 '12 at 19:06
    
@Servy then they right click the taskbar and choose "Close"? what if he has his own custom close button to handle some event OnClose that isn't easily supported elsewhere? I'm not sure this is really a question of morality ... –  Sam Aug 23 '12 at 19:06
    
@Sam I ask because there's almost always a better approach. The OP's answer has only confirmed that for me. As to your example, there's a FormClosing event for a reason. –  Servy Aug 23 '12 at 19:09
    
@Sam the machine this will run on will only serve one purpose. The taskbar won't be visible and there will be no mouse/keyboard to open it. I'll be providing a 7"(ish) touchscreen and a badge reader. –  Jared Aug 23 '12 at 19:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your best bet may be to subcribe to the FormClosing event of the form like so and cancel the closing action:

// In your code somewhere subscribe to this event
Form1.FormClosing += Form1_FormClosing;

void Form1_FormClosing(object sender, FormClosingEventArgs e)
{
    e.Cancel = true;
}

The benefit of doing this is that it prevents the user from closing the application from the close button and the taskbar.

Obviously you don't want to ALWAYS cancel the form from closing. So you will want to set some type of boolean flag that you will check in the event listener as to whether you want the form to be allowed to close or not. Example:

void Form1_FormClosing(object sender, FormClosingEventArgs e)
{
    if (BlockClosing)
        e.Cancel = true;
}

EDIT: If you don't want to approach the problem that way, and you really do intend to completely remove the close button, then your best bet is to create your own custom title bar. In that case, you set the form's FormBorderStyle property to None. And you then dock your custom title bar to the top of the form. Here is some sample code from one I made a while back:

using System;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Windows.Forms;

namespace Spectrum.UI
{
    public partial class TitleBar : UserControl
    {
        public delegate void EventHandler(object sender, EventArgs e);
        public event EventHandler MinButtonClick;
        public event EventHandler MaxButtonClick;
        public event EventHandler CloseButtonClick;

        #region Properties
        [Category("Appearance")]
        public string Title
        {
            get { return TitleLabel.Text; }
            set { TitleLabel.Text = value; }
        }

        [Category("Appearance")]
        public bool MinimizeEnabled
        {
            get
            {
                return minButton.Visible;
            }
            set
            {
                minButton.Visible = value;
            }
        }

        [Category("Appearance")]
        public bool MaximizeEnabled
        {
            get
            {
                return maxButton.Visible;
            }
            set
            {
                maxButton.Visible = value;
            }
        }
        #endregion

        public TitleBar()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
            ShowTitleBarImage = false;
        }

        #region Mouse Events
        private void TitleBar_MouseDown(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
        {
            this.OnMouseDown(e);
        }

        private void TitleBar_MouseUp(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
        {
            this.OnMouseUp(e);
        }

        private void TitleBar_MouseMove(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
        {
            this.OnMouseMove(e);
        }
        #endregion

        #region Button Click Events
        private void minButton_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            if (MinButtonClick != null)
                this.MinButtonClick.Invoke(this, e);
        }

        private void maxButton_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            if (MaxButtonClick != null) 
                this.MaxButtonClick.Invoke(this, e);
        }

        private void closeButton_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            if (CloseButtonClick != null) 
                this.CloseButtonClick.Invoke(this, e);
        }
        #endregion
    }
}

This is how my custom titlebar looked when I was done

As you can see from the image, I also added a background image to the control. Depending on your patience and your requirements, you can use images and PictureBox controls to make this look as much like a standard title bar as you need.

In the above example I placed three buttons on the control with images I found online to represent minimize, maximize, and close. in your case you would simply exclude a close button. I also placed a string on the control with an appropriate font to serve as the title of the window.

Adding the custom title bar to your form is easy.

public TitleBar titleBar = new TitleBar();
titleBar.Dock = DockStyle.Top;
titleBar.MaximizeEnabled = true;
titleBar.MinimizeEnabled = true;
titleBar.Size = new System.Drawing.Size(10, 40); // Width doesn't matter - I wanted it 40 pixels tall
titleBar.Title = "Title Example";
titleBar.MinButtonClick += titleBar_MinButtonClick;
titleBar.Max ButtonClick += titleBar_MaxButtonClick;
this.Controls.Add(this.TitleBar);

And then last step is to set up your event listeners for the min and max button clicks:

private void titleBar_MinButtonClick(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    WindowState = FormWindowState.Minimized;
}

private void titleBar_MaxButtonClick(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    WindowState = FormWindowState.Maximized;
}

You may also note that I included events for mouse down, up and move in my title bar. This was so that I could create listeners in my form to move the form when the user clicked and dragged the title bar. This is optional and depends on if you need the user to be able to move your application window.

The added benefit of doing this is that can use the title bar for additional controls. For example, my application was custom written for use on a toughbook style tablet computer with a small touchscreen display. In my application, utilization of the limited space was extremely important. I was able to further modify what I've described here to also include menu bar style control directly on the title bar. In addition, I added more buttons to the left of the stand minimize, maximize, and close buttons. Really helped me utilize every square inch of the screen in my application. Couldn't have done it with the standard title bar.

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I'm wanting to remove the button all together. –  Jared Aug 23 '12 at 21:13
    
Okay. Well it may seem a little odd but in the past when I have wanted to remove the close button altogehter, I set my form's FormBorderStyle property to None. This removes the title bar entirely. And then I made my own custom title bar for the top of the application. Not hard to do. It's essentially just a panel that you dock to the top of the form with a label for the title of the form. And if you wish to maintain a minimize and maximize button, you can very easily mimic their functions with two buttons and callbacks. –  Michael Mankus Aug 27 '12 at 11:45
    
I actually will probably end up doing this. If you will change your answer to this and elaborate with details I'll accept it as an answer. –  Jared Aug 28 '12 at 2:57
    
Added some code to get you started. It's very basic and you may need to add additional methods/properties to make it as much like a standard titlebar as you want it to be. –  Michael Mankus Aug 28 '12 at 18:31
    
I didn't need the code per se...just wanted something there in case someone else stumbles across this. –  Jared Aug 28 '12 at 22:08

Can you simply use Form.ControlBox = false (or via the designer as you point out rather negatively in your comment) and then add a custom help button on the form?

EDIT: A colleague of mine wrote an Excel addin and had a requirement to remove the X from certain forms (e.g. a Progress Bar that shouldn't be closed). He found a function written by Stephen Bullens that did just that. I've only seen this function used in VB, but perhaps you can get some ideas or direction out of his approach of using Windows API to solve your issue.

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+1, I have even seen people add a false bar, and then they handle the different events. –  Hanlet Escaño Aug 23 '12 at 19:04
    
This does the EXACT same thing as the ControlBox option in the visual designer. Your just doing it in code. –  Jared Aug 23 '12 at 19:07
1  
@Jared The point of my answer was not to show you how to use ControlBox in code vs in the visual designer, it was to bring to your attention the idea of using ControlBox (whether it's via code or designer, it does not matter) to get rid of the close box rather than disable it, like you want, then add your own custom help button physically on the form. –  Sam Aug 23 '12 at 19:12
    
The only reason I said that comment the way I did was because the response showed that you didn't read the question. I mention that property explicitly. I'm sorry if I sounded short/negative, but it just was something that I directly mentioned in the original question. –  Jared Aug 23 '12 at 19:19
    
@Jared The response shows that I read the qeustion and gave you a different approach to solving it with what you already knew. Hence, the second half of my answer. The whole idea to my answer was for you to use ControlBox (like you already were) and THEN add a CUSTOM help button on your form, since you literally can't make the X invisible without building the form from scratch. The only way to accomplish an invisible X with a help button is by using the aforementioned approach. I apologize for our miscommunication, as clearly it was half my fault as well ;-) –  Sam Aug 23 '12 at 19:25

This code will disable the Close button. I am not sure if you can actually make it invisible. http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/20379/Disabling-Close-Button-on-Forms

Good luck!

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1  
You can't. It's build into the API –  Cole Johnson Aug 23 '12 at 19:01
    
@ColeJohnson While you may not be able to "Disable" the button you can catch the close event and just discard it. I've done this before. I'd just assume remove the confusion of providing the button though –  Jared Aug 23 '12 at 19:08
    
It breaks expected UX functionality to catch the close event and ignore it. You should disable it –  Cole Johnson Aug 23 '12 at 19:12
    
@ColeJohnson in all honesty I'm really hoping to have the button not visible all together. My original question is simply if the Close button can be hidden while maintaining the Help button. –  Jared Aug 23 '12 at 19:17
    
You shouldn't remove the close button, but disable it. AFAIK you can't remove it without writing your own window control. But don't do that and break UX –  Cole Johnson Aug 23 '12 at 19:18

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