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I simply need to know how I can detect repeating decimal expansion in floats.

Example:

0.123456789123456789

The repeating portion of the number would be 123456789.

I want to automatize this in C#, is there any smart solution?

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3  
I don't believe there is anything built in, nor something that would be any close to accurate (seeing as there is finite precision) –  Oded Aug 23 '12 at 19:12
11  
"floats" don't have "periods". A string that represents a float might have a period. But the "float" is just a "value". Which can be represented many different ways. What you might be looking for is modf(), to extract the fractional part of a floating point value. –  paulsm4 Aug 23 '12 at 19:12
4  
As posed, the problem isn't well defined. The mantissa is finite in a floating point representation, so it's never going to represent correctly a repeating decimal. At best you can find the longest repeating string of values in the mantissa. If that's what you want, search for a string algorithm to find the longest repeating substring of a string and work from there. –  jwrush Aug 23 '12 at 19:14
    
Oded is right; it cannot be done, unless you can guarantee some restrictions (e.g. on the length of the repeating digits). –  Douglas Aug 23 '12 at 19:16
4  
@ColeJohnson - You completely misunderstood the question. –  Oded Aug 23 '12 at 19:18

7 Answers 7

There's a nice trick for calculating rational approximations to a given float (based on some properties of Euclid's algorithm for GCDs). We can use this to determine whether or not the "best" approximation is of the form A/(2^a 5^b), if it is then the float terminates (in base 10), if not it will have some repeating component. The tricky bit will be determining which of the approximations is the right one (due to floating point precission issues).

So heres how you get approximate rational expressions.

First iterate x = 1/x - floor(1/x) keeping track of int(x)

x = 0.12341234
1/x = 8.102917
x <= 1/x - 8 = 0.102917
1/x = 9.7165
x <= 1/x - 9 = 0.71265277
1/x = 1.3956
x < 1/x - 1 = 0.3956
...

Next stick the int parts of x into the top row of this table, call them k_i. The values A_i = A_{i-2} + k_i * A_{i-1} and the same for B_i.

           ||  8      |  9  | 1   | 2   | 1   |  1  |    8 |    1 |    1
A =    1 0 ||  1      |  9  | 10  | 29  | 39  |  68 |  583 |  651 | 1234
B =    0 1 ||  8      | 73  | 81  | 235 | 316 | 551 | 4724 | 5275 | 9999

The rational approximations are then A_n/B_n.

1/8       = 0.12500000000000000     | e = 1.5e-3
9/73      = 0.12328767123287671     | e = 1.2e-4
10/81     = 0.12345679012345678     | e = 4.4e-5
29/235    = 0.12340425531914893     | e = 8.1e-6
39/316    = 0.12341772151898735     | e = 5.4e-6
68/551    = 0.12341197822141561     | e = 3.6e-7
583/4724  = 0.12341236240474174     | e = 2.2e-8
651/5275  = 0.12341232227488151     | e = 1.8e-8
1234/9999 = 0.12341234123412341     | e = 1.2e-9

So if we decide our error is low enough at the 1234/9999 stage, we note that 9999 can not be written in the form 2^a 5^b, and thus our decimal expansion is repeating.

Note that while this seems to require a lot of steps we can get faster convergence if we use x = 1/x - round(1/x) (and keep track of round round(1/x) instead). In that case the table becomes

     8  10    -4     2      9     -2
1 0  1  10   -39   -68   -651   1234
0 1  8  81  -316  -551  -5275   9999

This gives you a subset of the previous results, in fewer steps.

It is interesting to note that the fraction A_i/B_i is always such that A_i and B_i have no common factors so you dont event need to worry about canceling out factors or anything like that.

For comparison lets look at the expansion for x = 0.123. The table we get is:

      8   8   -3    -5  
 1 0  1   8  -23   123
 0 1  8  65 -187  1000

Then our sequence of approximations is

 1/8      = 0.125       e = 2.0e-3
 8/65     = 0.12307..   e = 7.6e-5
 23/187   = 0.12299..   e = 5.3e-6
 123/1000 = 0.123       e = 0

And we see that 123/1000 is exactly the fraction we want and since 1000 = 10^3 = 2^3 5^3 our fraction is terminating.

If you actually want to find out what the repeating part of the fraction is (what digits and what period) you need to do some additional tricks. This involves factoring the denominator and finding the lowest number (10^k-1) with all those factors (other than 2 and 5), then k will be your period. So for our top case we found A = 9999 = 10^4-1 (and thus 10^4-1 contains all the factors of A - we were kind of lucky here...) so the period of the repeating part is 4. You can find more details about this final part here.

A final and important aspect of not of this algorithm is that it does not require all the digits to mark a decimal expansion as repeating. Consider x = 0.34482, this has the table:

     3 -10 -156
1 0  1 -10   . 
0 1  3 -29   .

We get a very accurate approximation at the second entry and stop there, concluding that our fraction is probably 10/29 (as that gets use within 1e-5) and from the tables in the link above we can discern that its period will be 28 digits. This could never be determined using string searches on the short version of the number, which would require at least 57 digits of the number to be known.

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1  
There's a bunch of assumptions I haven't really made explicit here. 1. Your number is an approximation to a rational of some form. Irrationals don't terminate or have a repeating form. 2. That the you're interested in the closest rational to some tolerance. –  Michael Anderson Aug 24 '12 at 11:46

you can't detect period like in your example as for representation in base 10, precision of float is 7 digits.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa691146%28v=vs.71%29.aspx

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You can isolate the fractional (post-period) part of the number like this:

value - Math.Floor(value)

If you do this with the double value "1.25", you'll end up with the value "0.25". Thus, you'll have isolated the part "to the right of the period". Of course, you'll have it as a double between 0 and 1, and not an integer as your question seems to require.

Your question states that you need to "detect periods in floats". If all you need is to determine if a fractional part exists, the following code will approximately work:

value != Math.Floor(value)
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+1 This is the way I would do it, subtract the integral value from the original value. –  Aaron Murgatroyd Aug 24 '12 at 0:34
    
@Ben: no, his question about repeating decimals (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Repeating_decimal). –  Dennis Aug 24 '12 at 5:46
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Depending on what you want to happen for negative numbers, Math.Truncate might be a better bet than Math.Floor. –  Mark Dickinson Aug 24 '12 at 7:34

Personally I would convert it to a String, snag the substring of everything after the period, then convert to the data type you need it in. For example (It's been years since I wrote any C# so forgive any syntax problems):

float checkNumber = 8.1234567;
String number = new String( checkNumber ); // If memory serves, this is completely valid
int position = number.indexOf( "." ); // This could be number.search("."), I don't recall the exact method name off the top of my head
if( position >= 0 ){ // Assuming search or index of gives a 0 based index and returns -1 if the substring is not found
    number = number.substring( position ); // Assuming this is the correct method name to retrieve a substring.
    int decimal = new Int( number ); // Again, if memory serves this is completely valid
}
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You can't.

Floating-point has finite precision. Every value of type float is an integer multiple of an integer power of 2.0 (X * 2Y), where X and Y are (possibly negative) integers). Since 10 is a multiple of 2, every value of type float can be represented exactly in a finite number of decimal digits.

For example, although you might expect 1.0f/3.0f to be represented as a repeating decimal (or binary) number, in fact float can only hold a close approximation of the mathematical value, one that isn't a repeating decimal (unless you count the repeating 0 that follows the non-zero digits). The stored value is likely to be exactly 0.3333333432674407958984375; only the first 7 or so digits after the decimal point are significant.

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This seems to work:

float checkNumber = 0.123456789;

float result = checkNumber - (int)checkNumber;

if (result > 0f)
    // number has a decimal point

You basically convert to an integer to drop the decimal places.. subtract that from the float (in this example, 0.123456789 - 0) and if the result is greater than 0.0000000 it has a decimal place. As another example, if checkNumber was 12.5, it would be: 12.5 - 12 = 0.5, which is greater than 0.000000000.

However, this won't work for decimal places of a rounded number, e.g: 12.00. That requirement wasn't in your question though.

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1  
How does '0.000000000f' differ from '0f'? –  NPSF3000 Aug 24 '12 at 0:23
    
It doesn't.. typed it out :) I will edit. –  Simon Whitehead Aug 24 '12 at 0:26
    
@SimonWhitehead: again, his question about repeating decimals (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Repeating_decimal). –  Dennis Aug 24 '12 at 5:47

I don't think that there's solution in general (at least, with float/double):

  • period can bee too long for float (or even double);
  • float/double are approximate values.

E.g., here's a result of division (double)1/(double)97:

0.010309278350515464

Indeed, it is a repeating decimal with 96 repeating digits in period. How to detect this, if you only have 18 digits after decimal point?

Even in decimal there's not enough digits:

0.0103092783505154639175257732
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I think you all guys know how to calculate in the 3rd schoolform? 47/183=0,2568....... 0 470 366 1040 915 1250 1098 ......... I got all there procedures in a string list. Format "first, second" "470,366" "1040,915" "1250,1098" So I just have to find, for example "470,366" again to see where the periode end/repeates. So how to find 2 equal entries in a string list? –  Abi Aug 23 '12 at 20:37
    
    
@Abi: as far as I understand, topicstarter has a float(double) as an input, he hasn't a pair 48/183 or 1/3, or 1/97, etc. See my answer for more clarification. –  Dennis Aug 24 '12 at 5:52

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