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I'm trying to get rid of that nasty variable declaration of ref in this instance, I'm sure there is a way to get out of the each scope to get the "this" of the on-call. I just have no idea how to.

$(document).on('click', '.item', function(){

    var ref = $(this).attr('data-id');

    $.each(t, function(){
        if(this.id == ref){
            //action
            return false;
        }
    });
}

This isn't really life or death, I just am trying to clean up code.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There is a way to do this: use the event reference passed to the event handler automatically.

$(document).on('click', '.item', function(e) {
    $.each(t, function(){
        if (this.id == $(e.target).attr('data-id')) {
            //action
            return false;
        }
    });
}

But, that doesn't buy you anything except more time to do other things while the code runs. ;)

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It should be noted, however, that this isn't an improvement, since repeatedly doing the jQuery selection within the loop (as opposed to doing it only once before the loop and saving the reference) is inefficient and bad practice. It's programming 101, leave stuff out of loops unless the value will change each time. @jamietre pointed out something similar above. –  nbrooks Aug 23 '12 at 19:39
1  
And as I pointed out (perhaps obliquely) with my last sentence... –  Mike McCaughan Aug 23 '12 at 19:40
    
Very true, just thought it needed stressing/explaining. Really more directed at OP than you, but I don't feel like getting into the argument of semantics above ;) –  nbrooks Aug 23 '12 at 19:46
    
That was exactly what I was looking for, I can't believe I overlooked events. Thank you. It was more of a ideal questions, I'm not worried about performance. –  Jonathan Aug 23 '12 at 20:13

Actually there is something you can do. You can bind your function to a context. Since you're using jQuery already you can use jQuery.proxy which takes in parameters function and context, binds that function to that context and return a new function.

Read this so you'll understand it a bit: http://www.robertsosinski.com/2009/04/28/binding-scope-in-javascript/

Then take a look at this: http://api.jquery.com/jQuery.proxy/

Hope this helps a bit... :)

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+1 - good idea, just not exactly what I was looking for. Thank you! –  Jonathan Aug 23 '12 at 20:11

Not sure what your intention is but if it's to simply reference this original element:

$(document).on('click', '.item', function(){
    var that = this;
    $.each(function(){
       // use 'that' however you'd like
       if ($(that).data().id == 'whatever') ...
     }
});

You can not "leave" a scope in javascript, you can merely reference declarations in parent scopes.

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