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Is anything like this possible? I'm assuming not, but it looks good to me:

class MyClass {
    public int Foo {
        get { return m_foo; }
        set {
            // Bounds checking, or other things that prevent the use
            // of an auto-implemented property
            m_foo = value;
        }

        // Put the backing field actually *in* the scope of the property
        // so that the rest of the class cannot access it.
        private int m_foo;
    }

    void Method() {
        m_foo = 42;    // Can't touch this!
    }
}

Of course I know this syntax is incorrect, and this will not compile. It was hypothetical-future-C# for the sake of clearly portraying my idea. I apologize for the somewhat hypothetical question, but it is too specific for Programmers.SE.

Something like this could be implemented in the compiler that would serve one purpose: Only allow the property's get and set accessors to see the field, essentially allowing the property to be self-contained (as auto-implemented properties are) while allowing additional get/set logic.

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2  
Is this a simple yes/no question ('cause then it's no), or do you want alternative solutions to this "problem"? –  Christoffer Lette Aug 23 '12 at 19:35
    
I'm just curious what you are trying to achieve by doing this? –  Stefan H Aug 23 '12 at 19:36
1  
@StefanH AvadaKedavra hit the nail on the head. The only purpose for having the field is for backing the property. Thus, it would be nice to confine its use to that property. –  Jonathon Reinhart Aug 23 '12 at 20:01
1  
@Servy and how does one perform bounds checking and throw an exception on an illegal value using an auto-implemented property? You can't. –  Jonathon Reinhart Aug 23 '12 at 20:03
1  
@Servy: Won't work if you need to add logic to your properties. –  Avada Kedavra Aug 23 '12 at 20:03
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6 Answers 6

up vote 30 down vote accepted

The short answer is no, that's not possible in C# today.

We get a feature request like this fairly often; it's a nice feature in its more general form. The more general form is to more clearly make the lifetime of a local variable orthogonal to its scope.

Just to make sure those terms are clear: a variable is a storage location, possibly named. Every variable has a lifetime: the amount of time at runtime in which the variable is guaranteed to refer to valid storage. The scope of a name is the region of text in which that name may be used; it is a compile-time concept, not a runtime concept. A local variable is a variable whose scope is a statement block.

In many languages, the lifetime of a local variable is closely tied to its scope: when control logically enters the scope at runtime, the lifetime begins and when it leaves the scope, the lifetime ends. This is true in C# with some notable caveats:

  • The lifetime of a local may be extended or truncated if the runtime can determine that doing so has no consequence to the action of managed code on the current thread. The actions of other threads (like the finalizer thread) and unmanaged code on the current thread are implementation-defined.

  • The lifetime of a local that is in an iterator block, an async method, or a closed-over outer variable of an anonymous function, may be extended to match or exceed the lifetime of the iterator, task, delegate or expression tree that uses it.

Clearly it is not a requirement that the lifetime and scope of a local be tied together in any way. It would be nice if we could explicitly have locals that have the lifetime of an instance or static field, but the scope of a local. C has this feature; you can make a "static" local variable. C# does not. Your proposal is essentially to allow a local variable within the block of the property that has the lifetime of the instance but whose scope is restricted to the block.

I would classify this feature as "nice". We have a list of potential "nice" features literally as long as your arm that we don't have time to implement, so I wouldn't expect this one to make it to the top of the list any time soon. Thanks for the feedback though; it helps us prioritize that list somewhat.

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1  
Question: is there a simple general change to the design of the C# language that would decouple variable lifetime and scope? You point out that property-scoped variables (OP's question) and static locals in C (your example) are specific cases of decoupling lifetime from scope, but I can't think of what the general case would be. –  phoog Nov 30 '12 at 18:01
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Here's my take on that:

public class WrappedField<T>
{
    public class Internals
    {
        public T Value;
    }

    private readonly Internals _internals = new Internals();
    private readonly Func<Internals, T> _get;
    private readonly Action<Internals, T> _set;

    public T Value
    {
        get { return _get(_internals); }
        set { _set(_internals, value); }
    }

    public WrappedField(Func<Internals, T> get, Action<Internals, T> set)
    {
        _get = get;
        _set = set;            
    }

    public WrappedField(Func<Internals, T> get, Action<Internals, T> set, T initialValue)
        : this(get, set)
    {
        _set(_internals, initialValue);
    }
}

Usage:

class Program
{
    readonly WrappedField<int> _weight = new WrappedField<int>(
        i => i.Value,           // get
        (i, v) => i.Value = v,  // set
        11);                    // initialValue

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Program p = new Program();
        p._weight.Value = 10;

        Console.WriteLine(p._weight.Value);
    }
}
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you can also implement custom implicit conversion so the user code won't be affected and you wouldn't have to use varname.Value to set and get the value of the property –  Sonia Sep 26 '12 at 7:17
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According to the C# 4.0 language specifications.

However, unlike fields, properties do not denote storage locations. Instead, properties have accessors that specify the statements to be executed when their values are read or written.

Adding a field would require a memory location. So no, this is not possible.

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1  
I understand what you are saying, but that doesn't really apply here. I'm only concerned with the lexical scope of the field, not where it is stored in memory. Of course, properties just boil down to _get() and _set() methods, so the field would still be contained in the context of the class. –  Jonathon Reinhart Aug 23 '12 at 20:02
    
@JonathonReinhart - If the containing type is not the property then what utility does the concept provide? The containing type, e.g. class can still access the private field. This also raises the question of whether a property can even be considered a containing type. –  P.Brian.Mackey Aug 23 '12 at 20:04
2  
I'm just saying, something like this could be implemented in the compiler that would serve one purpose: Only allow the property's get and set accessors to see the field, essentially allowing the property to be self-contained (as auto-implemented properties are) while allowing additional logic. –  Jonathon Reinhart Aug 23 '12 at 20:06
    
@JonathonReinhart - Perhaps you can email Eric Lippert to see if the compiler team will take this into consideration in C# 6. The fact remains that this is currently not possible. –  P.Brian.Mackey Aug 23 '12 at 20:58
    
Why the downvote? –  P.Brian.Mackey Sep 28 '12 at 15:04
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If you would like to avoid generics, you could always hide the _backingField and the bounds checking in a private inner class. You could even hide it further by making the outer class partial. Of course, there would have to be some delegating going on between the outer and the inner class, which is a bummer. Code to explain my thoughts:

public partial class MyClass
{
    public int Property
    {
        get { return _properties.Property; }
        set { _properties.Property = value; }
    }

    public void Stuff()
    {
        // Can't get to _backingField...
    }
}

public partial class MyClass
{
    private readonly Properties _properties = new Properties();

    private class Properties
    {
        private int _backingField;

        public int Property
        {
            get { return _backingField; }
            set
            {
                // perform checks
                _backingField = value;
            }
        }
    }
}

But this is a lot of code. To justify all that boiler plate, the original problem has to be quite severe...

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Why would anybody want to avoid generics? –  Grozz Aug 23 '12 at 21:16
    
@Grozz I don't know. I sure wouldn't. I actually upvoted Servy's answer. But, there were two answers already that was based on generics, so I thought "what the h**l"... :-) –  Christoffer Lette Aug 23 '12 at 22:00
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Nope, the only thing that can be within the the body of the property is the get and set.

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Well, it's rather difficult to deal with, probably not very performant, and not something I'd really use, but technically it's a way of obscuring the backing field from the rest of the class.

public class MySuperAwesomeProperty<T>
{
    private T backingField;
    private Func<T, T> getter;
    private Func<T, T> setter;
    public MySuperAwesomeProperty(Func<T, T> getter, Func<T, T> setter)
    {
        this.getter = getter;
        this.setter = setter;
    }

    public T Value
    {
        get
        {
            return getter(backingField);
        }
        set
        {
            backingField = setter(value);
        }
    }
}

public class Foo
{
    public MySuperAwesomeProperty<int> Bar { get; private set; }


    public Foo()
    {
        Bar = new MySuperAwesomeProperty<int>(
            value => value, value => { doStuff(); return value; });

        Bar.Value = 5;

        Console.WriteLine(Bar.Value);
    }

    private void doStuff()
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}
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There is nothing stopping you from setting the backing field from within the MySuperAwesomeProperty class. This also misses the point of the original question IMO. –  user981225 Aug 24 '12 at 0:54
    
@user981225 The whole point of the property class is that it will be sealed and contained somewhere, not to be modified. Other classes simply use it, rather than a property of the actual value, to allow for custom getters/setters without access to the backing field. It won't prevent against modification due to reflection, but at that level even the backing field of a regular property can be accessed. How is this not the point of the original question? –  Servy Aug 24 '12 at 0:57
    
My apologies, you are correct. IF you edit the post so I can upvote, I will. –  user981225 Aug 24 '12 at 15:42
    
This code doesn't let setter use the field. You have to call getter to get the current value. –  Grozz Aug 28 '12 at 22:35
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