Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I understand why these 2 statements are false

NULL LIKE 'X'
NULL NOT LIKE 'X'

However, what I don't understand is why these are :

NOT (NULL LIKE 'X')
NOT (NULL NOT LIKE 'X')

For example, these two statements should, I think, return different values :

SELECT CASE WHEN NOT (NULL LIKE 'X') THEN 'True' ELSE 'False' END
SELECT CASE WHEN     (NULL LIKE 'X') THEN 'True' ELSE 'False' END
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

SQL uses a three-valued logic. You say that these are all false:

NULL LIKE 'X'
NULL NOT LIKE 'X'
NOT (NULL LIKE 'X')
NOT (NULL NOT LIKE 'X')

but that's actually not true. They're all null, which is neither true nor false.

A WHEN or WHERE clause rejects non-true values, which means null values as well as false ones, so it may seem like null is the same as false, but as you've noticed, it's not. :-)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I understood easily with your post. I thought that NULL LIKE [Whatever] was false, not null. Didn't thought that LIKE could return NULL –  Tipx Aug 23 '12 at 19:53
    
@Tipx: You're welcome! Yeah, the three-valued logic is one of the more confusing, and controversial, aspects of SQL. –  ruakh Aug 23 '12 at 19:58

NULL is always NULL you cannot compare it to something like that. It cannot be true or false which is what you are looking for as an answer.

It is just like you cannot compare, this will always return zero rows because NULL is an unknown value.

SELECT *
FROM yourTable 
WHERE yourCol = NULL
share|improve this answer

NULL is always undefined.

So the value of

not (NULL like X) is undefined

and also

not (NULL not like X) is undefined

The best approximation of Undefined is NULL so both statements evaluate to NULL (NOT, you understand, equal NULL, we don't know what they equal)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.