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I have a text-delimited file on the wikipedia edit history.Each line consists of a different wikipedia edit. The file is sorted by page title such that each edit for each page is its own line (the line is tab-delimited with 7 different variables). All I need is the first and last edit for each page. What I would like to have is a similar file to this where there is only one line per wikipedia page such that each line contained all of the information from the first and last edit for that page. Essentially one line that was a combination of the first and last edit line from the file.

I was wondering if there was an easy bash script or short python code (something I could run in a mac osx terminal) that would go through the txt file and output what I wanted.

Thank you for any help!

Here are the first few lines of the file to get an idea of what it looks like:

6   233188  AmericanSamoa   2001-01-19T01:12:51Z    ip:office.bomis.com ip:office.bomis.com 1516
6   133180191   AmericanSamoa   2007-05-24T14:41:33Z    Ngaiklin    4477979 5
8   233189  AppliedEthics   2001-01-20T15:01:12Z    ip:pD950754B.dip.t-dialin.net   ip:pD950754B.dip.t-dialin.net   9
8   133180238   AppliedEthics   2007-05-24T14:41:48Z    Ngaiklin    4477979 6
10  233192  AccessibleComputing 2001-01-21T02:12:21Z    RoseParks   99  8
10  133180268   AccessibleComputing 2007-05-24T14:41:58Z    Ngaiklin    4477979 6
12  18201   Anarchism   2002-02-25T15:00:22Z    ip:Conversion_script    ip:Conversion_script    1214
12  19746   Anarchism   2002-02-25T15:43:11Z    ip:140.232.153.45   ip:140.232.153.45   1460
12  19749   Anarchism   2002-02-27T17:34:09Z    ip:24.188.31.147    ip:24.188.31.147    1474

An example of the output given the above lines would look like: (keep in mind that each page has a varying number of edits ranging from two to several hundreds and I want only the first and last edits for every page. I would like the output similar to the following example where for every page there was one line that contained this first and last edit information.

6   233188  AmericanSamoa   2001-01-19T01:12:51Z    ip:office.bomis.com ip:office.bomis.com 1516    2007-05-24T14:41:33Z    Ngaiklin    4477979 5
8   233189  AppliedEthics   2001-01-20T15:01:12Z    ip:pD950754B.dip.t-dialin.net   ip:pD950754B.dip.t-dialin.net   9    2007-05-24T14:41:48Z   Ngaiklin    4477979 6
10  233192  AccessibleComputing 2001-01-21T02:12:21Z    RoseParks   99  8   2007-05-24T14:41:58Z    Ngaiklin    4477979 6
12  18201   Anarchism   2002-02-25T15:00:22Z    ip:Conversion_script    ip:Conversion_script    1214   2002-02-27T17:34:09Z ip:24.188.31.147    ip:24.188.31.147    1474
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1  
Welcome to StackOverflow. Please be more selective with your tags. This question has nothing to do with wikipedia itself. It's about parsing tab-delimited text. :-) It also helps if you indicate what operating system and programming/scripting language you're asking about; it won't do much good if someone provides a bash script and you're running Windows, or a PowerShell script if you're on OS X. You can edit your question to add the proper tags. If you provide details in your question and tags, it helps you get answers faster. :-) – Ken White Aug 23 '12 at 20:11
1  
Please include some example output. It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. – Steve Aug 24 '12 at 3:09
    
If you can ensure the file is sorted correctly, ie. by title, then date, you could write a PHP/Perl/Python script with priming read, save title,and output-on-title-change code. I think this would be a fair bit easier than trying to do things in bash. If your file is NOT sorted, you could use hash maps to achieve the same thing. Have a go, and post some code for review rather than get people to write this thing for you. – Pete855217 Aug 24 '12 at 7:26

Your example output is a little inconsistent, because the first line has the article name twice. Assuming you don't really need that, and also assuming that the file is correctly sorted, the following command works for me on your example:

sed -r ':r;$!{N;br};s/\n/#/g;s/(^|#)((\S+\s+){2})(\S+\s+)([^#]*).*#(\S+\s+){2}\4/\1\2\4\5/g;s/#/\n/g' history.txt

Yet another assumption is that your file doesn't contain any # characters, otherwise you'll need to change # to something else that isn't encountered in the file.

I'm guessing you'll need some explanation, but first I'd like to make sure it does what you need. Please comment about the results :)

P.S. It processes the whole file at once and may turn out to be too slow for you.

share|improve this answer
    
That's a really impressive bit of sed regex there Lev! Runs on my *nix box fine, but simply repeats each line when I run it on a Mac and gives an 'unused label' message for the whole regex. This happens even though I changed the -r flag (*nix) to -E to get extended regex for sed on a Mac. – Pete855217 Aug 24 '12 at 8:30
    
@Pete Thanks for the feedback! I'm having some trouble adapting the command to POSIX, any help is appreciated. – Lev Levitsky Aug 24 '12 at 8:59
    
@Pete Does this one work on Mac? sed ':r;$!{N;br};s/\n/#/g;s/\(^\|#\)\(\([[:alnum:]]\{1,\}[[:blank:]]\{1,\}\)\{2\}\)\‌​([[:alnum:]]\{1,\}[[:blank:]]\{1,\}\)\([^#]*\).*#\([[:alnum:]]\{1,\}[[:blank:]]\{‌​1,\}\)\{2\}\4/\1\2\4\5/g;s/#/\n/g' history.txt – Lev Levitsky Aug 24 '12 at 9:10
    
No Lev, sorry - still produces the same result ie. ":r;$!{N;br};s/\n/#/g;s/ ...": unused label. For some reason, it's missing the regex. Tried single/double quotes, no luck. Other basic sed regexes (eg. 's/hello/goodby/g' are working fine. Can I ask what the :r does at the start of the regex? – Pete855217 Aug 24 '12 at 9:18
    
@Pete :r defines a label, and br then branches back to it. This way I read the whole file into pattern space line by line. – Lev Levitsky Aug 24 '12 at 9:29

I would do it in two steps.

  • Let's say your data has been organized as a list of strings (eg, with file.readlines()), the list being data. We start building a dictionary taking the first column as key, and whose values is a list of 2 lists, the first one your first entry, the second one your last entry.

    results = {}
    for line in data.split("\n"):
        fields = line.strip().split("\t")
        tag = fields[0]
        if tag:
            tag = int(tag)
            if tag in results:
                # last entry: skip the first three fields
                results[tag][1] = fields[3:]
            else:
                # first entry: skip the first field
                results[tag] = [fields[1:], []]
    
  • Now that we have our dictionary, it's only a matter of sorting it, combining the two lists and pretty-printing the results

    ordered_results = []
    for k in sorted(results.keys()):
        current = results[k]
        ordered_results.append(current[0]+current[1])
    print "\n".join("\t".join(row) for row in ordered_results)
    
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