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Our application makes heavy use of tables for layout and positioning, and has in the past been IE (quirks-mode) only. Moving forward, we are trying to get out of quirks mode, and replace the tables with divs and a more semantic layout.

The one thing stopping us is a quirks mode "feature" which allowed us to set height=100% on a table row, and have the row take up the remaing vertical space. So far, we have not been able to find a way to do this outside of quirks mode, either with or without tables.

This is the code we are using in the body of the page. No styling shown here, but the effect is still the same:

<table width="100%" height="100%" border="0">
    <tr>
        <td>
            <table width="100%" height="100%" border="1">
                <tr>
                    <th>This is my header bar</th>
                </tr>
            </table>
        </td>
    </tr>
    <tr height="100%">
        <td>
            <table width="100%" height="100%" border="1">
                <tr>
                    <td>This is my main section bar</td>
                </tr>
            </table>
        </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td>
            <table width="100%" height="100%" border="1">
                <tr>
                    <td>This is my footer bar</th>
                </tr>
            </table>
        </td>
    </tr>

This is what it looks like in Quirks mode. Note that the middle row (with height="100%") has expanded to take up the remaining vertical space:

Quirks mode rendering

Standards mode renders the same code like this:

Standards modes

jsFiddle with the code: http://jsfiddle.net/RBeWN/3/ (Note that due to iFrames, etc. the code won't actually render in quirks mode on jsFiddle but you can force it by using Dev Tools).

I attempted to do this with divs and some css, but it doesn't work: http://jsfiddle.net/BVMhR/3/. Setting the main div to height: 100%; gives it the same height as its parent, rather than making it take the remaining space. Setting box-sizing: border-box; makes no difference to this either.

Could someone help me find a solution to this problem? I'd like to be able to do it without javascript if at all possible, but if Javascript is needed, it would have to be a generic solution that can run on every page so that there isn't too much development overhead for setting it up.

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Do You just want the footer to stick to to bottom of the page, or you also need the main content to be verticaly centered? –  Kristóf Dombi Aug 23 '12 at 20:01
    
@KristófDombi The footer will sit below the main content, but won't stick to the bottom of the page. If the content is too long, it will be wrapped inside another div and scrolled. –  a_m0d Aug 23 '12 at 20:05
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

After playing around with quite a few different layouts, and clarifying a few specifics regarding the requirements, I have found a way to do this with pure CSS.

It does involve knowing the heights of both the top and bottom row (although they could be specified in %), and also does involve a few extra layers of divs.

My example can be found in this jsFiddle. Notice that when expanding / shrinking the window, the middle row re-sizes appropriately. It is also possible to make this one into a scrolling div if necessary (with overflow: auto) so that the content will scroll when it is too long.

Feel free to contact me with any extra questions about this layout if needed.

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The horizontal scrollbar is a little odd but I can't figure how it's being forced to appear... –  Roddy of the Frozen Peas Aug 24 '12 at 15:21
    
See my fix for the horizontal scroll bar in my edit to my answer. –  Gus Aug 24 '12 at 16:00
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I don't think this can be solved with pure CSS.

http://jsfiddle.net/AZcZx/10/

This is how I would do it with javascript... I'm sortof assuming based on your names for the divs that this is how your pages handled header, content, footer and so this should be general enough for that.

I've added borders/margins to show that there is an edge case there, which jQuery helps nicely with... I also assume that the content vertical centering in your quirks-mode example is not part of the question.

EDIT:

I stand corrected. It can be done with CSS, though it creates a width issue that was not quite trivial to fix, so here's the fix for that:

http://jsfiddle.net/AZcZx/27/

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Gus, I did actuall manage to solve this problem with pure CSS - see my answer above for how I did it. –  a_m0d Aug 24 '12 at 12:49
    
I have to say I'm happy it doesn't require javascript :). Forgot about position absolute... –  Gus Aug 24 '12 at 15:25
    
Bad news... I started playing around with IE developer tools and switching modes... quirks mode and IE 7 seem to degrade the CSS versions a bit more than my javascript version, so I guess it depends on how badly you want to support older browsers. –  Gus Aug 24 '12 at 15:58
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Do you know the height of the header and the footer? Looking at your fiddle example with the divs, they both have a fixed height. If that is the case you could just absolutely position them to the top and bottom, and add a margin to the top and bottom of your #divMain.

You also need the html and body set to height: 100%; and the #divMain set to min-height: 100%;

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You need to expand the body and HTML to 100% for this to work. "height:100%" makes an item 100% of its parent. Without a defined size of the parent, it will only be as large as its children.

body, html {height:100%}
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If you look at the jsfiddle I posted at the end, I have done this. As I said, doing this makes the divMain the same height as its parent rather than taking up the remaining space. –  a_m0d Aug 23 '12 at 19:58
    
Try this: #divMain { height: 100%; border:1px solid #ff0000 } –  Diodeus Aug 23 '12 at 19:59
    
That just draws a red box the same size as the document, in the middle of the document. What were you expecting it to do? jsfiddle.net/BVMhR/4 –  a_m0d Aug 23 '12 at 20:06
    
It's just so you can see the box- works for me in FF. –  Diodeus Aug 23 '12 at 21:28
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