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So I have a situation where I want to put a very long Terms of Use document onto a page on my company's web site, but it was way too long to put in the main "content" area. I would like to use a scroll area, so that user can see the terms of use as rendered originally. So you can see what I mean, I need the entire section c off of the Apple web page:

http://www.apple.com/legal/itunes/us/terms.html#APPS

I looked into putting the HTML code for that section of the Terms of Use in <textarea> element, but apparently <textarea> will not render HTML code. Is there a solution so that I do not have a web page like 4000px high? Thanks.

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1  
A Javascript pop-up window, maybe? window.open ("terms_of_use.html","Terms of Use",menubar=0,resizable=0); – paulsm4 Aug 23 '12 at 20:16
    
@paulsm4 A cool way to do it, but I preferred Mike's idea which avoids Javascript. Thanks though! – thatidiotguy Aug 23 '12 at 20:31
    
Actually, I prefer Mike's idea too ;) – paulsm4 Aug 23 '12 at 22:32
up vote 7 down vote accepted

Put the content into a div with a fixed height, and set the css overflow property to 'auto' this will create a scrollable div

<div style='height:80px; overflow:auto;'>
content here
</div>

of course you should use a separate style sheet but that's a different story

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You can create a div to contain the content and specify a height, then user overflow: auto in your CSS to make it scrollable.

Like this:-

http://jsbin.com/ifolaf/2/edit

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You could create another .html file and have an <iframe> of it embedded with a set height and width.

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