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I want be able to chain methods on a node instance that has children and grandchildren nodes. When I call a method on that top node, I want to be able to return the children and grandchildren of that object. I also want to be able to get attributes of those children and grandchildren from the very top node. I have the following data model:

class GrandParent(object):
    def __init__(self,name='',age=0,is_retired=True,children=[]):
        self.name = name
        self.age = age
        self.is_retired = is_retired

        if children:
            self.children = children

    def print_mychildren(self):
       for child in self.children:
            print "Child: ",child

    def mychildren(self):
        return self.children

    def __str__(self):
        return "name: %s age: %s is_retired:%s" %(self.name,self.age,self.is_retired)


class Parent(object):
    def __init__(self,name='',age=0,has_mortgage=True,children=[]):
        self.name = name
        self.age = age
        self.has_mortgage = has_mortgage

        if children:
            self.children = children

    def print_mychildren(self):
       for child in self.children:
            print "Child: ",child

    def __str__(self):
        return "name: %s age: %s has_mortgage: %s" %(self.name,self.age,self.has_mortgage)


class Child(object):
    def __init__(self,name='',age=0,has_toys=True):

        self.name = name
        self.age = age
        self.has_toys = has_toys

    def __str__(self):
        return "name: %s age: %s has_toys:%s" %(self.name,self.age,self.has_toys)



if __name__ == '__main__':

    beaver = Child('Beaver',12,True)
    ward = Child('Ward',16,False)

    june = Parent('June',38,True,[beaver,ward])

    grandpa = GrandParent('Grandpa',61,True,[june])

    print grandpa

    grandpa.print_mychildren() # print June

    # Doesn't work
    grandpa.mychildren().print_mychildren() #  I want it to print Ward and Beaver
    # Doesn't work
    print grandpa.mychildren().mychild('Beaver').age # I want it to return an age

Please note that I want to keep GrandParent, Parent, and Child classes separate because I want to give different attributes to each class such as has_mortgage or is_retired.

From the above data model, I'd like to be able to chain the methods so as to traverse the children of the top node. It would look like this:

grandpa.children # returns a list of children
print grandpa.mychild('June').has_mortgage # returns the value
grandpa.mychildren().mychildren() # prints a list of grandchildren
print grandpa.mychildren().mychild('Ward').has_toys # return the value

In other words, can I make the statement:

print grandpa.mychildren().mychildren()

behave like:

for child in grandpa.children:
        for grandchild in child.children:
            print grandchild

I would appreciate your answers to this. Thank you.

Paul
Chicago, IL

share|improve this question
    
Seems to me that this is a use case for inheritance. You should take all of the common attributes/methods for each class and group them into one class. Then, inherit from that class for each of your subclasses (Grandparent, Parent, and Child). – Joel Cornett Aug 23 '12 at 20:41
    
I'm voting to close this question as "Too localized", but my suggestion is to combine the myChild and myChildren methods. def myChildren(name=None): for example. Passing an argument would then signify what purpose you are calling the method for. – Joel Cornett Aug 23 '12 at 20:49
    
What do you mean with "Too localized". I agree, that subclassing would help to clean up the code, but would not help to solve the described problem – schacki Aug 23 '12 at 20:50
    
I added a clarification to my question at the bottom. Basically, I'm asking whether I chain methods so that it behaves as if I am looping through the children as I go down the nodes. – Paul Aug 24 '12 at 1:04
up vote 1 down vote accepted

One way is to create a wrapper for the list collection (slightly similar to how jQuery handles method chaining)

Code:

class ChainList(list):
    def __getattribute__(self, name):
        try:
            return object.__getattribute__(self, name)
        except:
            pass

        return ChainList([getattr(child, name) 
            for child in self if name in dir(child)])

    def __call__(self, *args, **kwargs):       
        return ChainList([child(*args, **kwargs)
            for child in self if callable(child)])

class GrandParent(object):
    def __init__(self,name='',age=0,is_retired=True,children=[]):
        self.name = name
        self.age = age
        self.is_retired = is_retired

        if children:
            self.children = ChainList(children)

    def print_mychildren(self):
       for child in self.children:
            print "Child: ",child

    def mychildren(self):
        return self.children

    def __str__(self):
        return "name: %s age: %s is_retired:%s" %(self.name,self.age,self.is_retired)

class Parent(object):
    def __init__(self,name='',age=0,has_mortgage=True,children=[]):
        self.name = name
        self.age = age
        self.has_mortgage = has_mortgage

        if children:
            self.children = ChainList(children)

    def print_mychildren(self):
       for child in self.children:
            print "Child: ",child

    def __str__(self):
        return "name: %s age: %s has_mortgage: %s" %(self.name,self.age,self.has_mortgage)

    def mychild(self, name):
        for child in self.children:
            if child.name == name:
                return child

class Child(object):
    def __init__(self,name='',age=0,has_toys=True):

        self.name = name
        self.age = age
        self.has_toys = has_toys

    def __str__(self):
        return "name: %s age: %s has_toys:%s" %(self.name,self.age,self.has_toys)



if __name__ == '__main__':

    beaver = Child('Beaver',12,True)
    ward = Child('Ward',16,False)

    june = Parent('June',38,True,[beaver,ward])

    grandpa = GrandParent('Grandpa',61,True,[june])

    print grandpa

    grandpa.print_mychildren() # print June

    # Doesn't work
    grandpa.mychildren().print_mychildren() #  I want it to print Ward and Beaver
    # Doesn't work
    print grandpa.mychildren().mychild('Beaver').age # I want it to return an age

The main idea is the ChainList class and overriding __getattribute__ and __call__ and wrapping all lists that needs to be chained with this class.

I also added mychild() to Parent to make the example work.

share|improve this answer
    
That's some Python wizardry that I don't fully understand. I have to brush up on __getattribute__ and __call__. Very cool. I appreciate it - thank you, nehz. – Paul Aug 24 '12 at 2:43
    
Might of deleted your comment by mistake, but anyways, grandpa.mychild('June').age seems to work for me when I add the method... the method def should be the same as the Parent one – nehz Aug 24 '12 at 3:19
    
Also just a suggestion, this kind software design is not very conventional. Consider comments from Joel Cornett about inheritance. – nehz Aug 24 '12 at 3:31
    
Yes, it works thanks. I had a typo. I guess for long-term code maintenance and to follow best practices, inheritance is best. Though I'm glad Python allows me the flexibility to implement this specific behavior, at least for prototyping purposes. – Paul Aug 24 '12 at 21:06

You can do what you want, but it will require a bit of work. You'll need to make the children value of your Parent and Grandparent classes a custom container that maps accesses to methods and member variables to its contents.

Here's a possible implementation. It may have some weird corner cases that I haven't sorted out, but it works for the basic stuff I've tried:

from operator import attrgetter

class mappingContainer(object):
    def __init__(self, contents):
        self.contents = contents

    # sequence protocol methods    
    def __getitem__(self, index):
        return self.contents[index]

    def __setitem__(self, index, value):
        self.contents[index] = value

    def __iter__(self):
        return iter(self.contents)

    def __contains__(self, o):
        return o in self.contents

    def __len__(self):
        return len(self.contents)

    # map attribute access and method calls
    def __getattr__(self, name):
        return mappingContainer(map(attrgetter(name), self.contents))

    def __call__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        return mappingContainer([o(*args, **kwargs) for o in self.contents])

    # string conversions
    def __repr__(self):
        return "mappingContainer(%s)" % repr(self.contents)

Here's a simple "Person" class that I used to test it out. Each person has a name, zero or more children in a mappingContainer and a single arbitrarily named method that prints something and returns a value.

class Person(object):
    def __init__(self, name, children = None):
        self.name = name
        if not children:
            children = []
        self.children = mappingContainer(children)

    def __repr__(self):
        return self.name

    def someMethod(self):
        print "%s's someMethod()" % str(self)
        return "%s's return value" % str(self)

Here's how I tested it (with long lines wrapped, for showing here):

>>> c1 = Person("Adam")
>>> c2 = Person("Albert")
>>> c3 = Person("Alice")
>>> c4 = Person("Agnes")
>>> p1 = Person("Bob", [c1, c2])
>>> p2 = Person("Betty", [c3,c4])
>>> gp = Person("Charles", [p1, p2])
>>> gp
Charles
>>> gp.children
mappingContainer([Bob, Betty])
>>> gp.children.children
mappingContainer([mappingContainer([Adam, Albert]),
                  mappingContainer([Alice, Agnes])])
>>> gp.children.children.someMethod()
Adam's someMethod()
Albert's someMethod()
Alice's someMethod()
Agnes's someMethod()
mappingContainer([mappingContainer(["Adam's return value",
                                    "Albert's return value"]),
                  mappingContainer(["Alice's return value",
                                    "Agnes's return value"])])

Now this may not be quite what you want, since you can't directly iterate over the grandchildren via gp.children.children (and though function calls will bubble all the way down, their results will still be nested in two layers of containers). I think the mappingContainer might be adjusted in some way to deal with that, but I'm not sure it is worth it.

Chained calls of this sort are going to be a nightmare to debug if anything goes wrong (and unless you're superhuman, something in your code will always go wrong at some point in development). Your code will be much easier to write and understand if you explicitly iterate or recurse through the hierarchy of relationships you have.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply, Blckknght. You raise a very interesting implementation. I'll have to study further since I'm not very advanced yet. Thanks for your time. :) – Paul Aug 24 '12 at 2:48

To me this sounds very much like you were talking about models and model relations. Have a look at Django. Django Models will do exactly what you want and you can define relations between models and query across those relations.

share|improve this answer
2  
What does this have to do with Django? There's no indication he wants the classes to be persistently held in a database, or that that's even an option. And this can be done using OO patterns without incuding an unnecessary web framework around it. – David Robinson Aug 23 '12 at 21:05
    
This certainly can be done using OO. I am just not sure how much coding is required - or I am actually afraid that this will require a lot of coding, while Django would provide it more or less out of the Box. But Paul will need to decide, whether it is worthwhile. But anyway, I am happy so see the OO solution. – schacki Aug 23 '12 at 21:14
    
Hi. I was hoping that Python would let me do it with special methods that are already part of Python, not from Django. So yes, I would like to see it in OO. :) – Paul Aug 23 '12 at 22:30

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