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I have this javascript function to trigger with the body onload function, but I cannot get it to work. What am I doing wrong here? Here is my fiddle and code below:

HTML:

<body onload="loading()">
    <div id="container">
    </div>
</body>

JS:

function loading(){   
  document.getElementById('container').css("background-image", "none");
}

also tried

function loading(){   
  document.getElementById('container').cssText = "background-image: none";
}

CSS:

body{
  background: #000;
}
#container {
width: 600px;
height: 500px;
margin:0 auto;
background-image: url("http://lamininbeauty.co.za/images/gallery/loading.png");
background-repeat: no-repeat;
background-position: 50% 50%;
}​
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7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted

getElementById returns an html element which has no method .css(). Its jQuery that has that method, also you have your function in onload so its wrapped in a function, you want it in no wrap head.

http://jsfiddle.net/3pDsJ/35/

share|improve this answer
    
yeah just realized that as well, thank you –  Dexter Schneider Aug 23 '12 at 20:29
    
you were the first one that pointed out that I was using the wrong framework all the time –  Dexter Schneider Aug 23 '12 at 20:38

Try:

function loading(){   
  document.getElementById('container').style.backgroundImage= "none";
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks, but nope, that does not work...look at my JS fiddle –  Dexter Schneider Aug 23 '12 at 20:26
    
It works but not in the fiddle since the onload isn't being fired. Try it in your own page instead of the fiddle. –  j08691 Aug 23 '12 at 20:28
    
Try this fiddle which runs it on the onload: jsfiddle.net/j08691/vBY5Z –  j08691 Aug 23 '12 at 20:28
    
yeah I did not activate the no wrap head..thanks for your answer –  Dexter Schneider Aug 23 '12 at 20:31
    
Yup, bottom line was really the syntax of your JavaScript, not the placement of the code (that was secondary). –  j08691 Aug 23 '12 at 20:32

You are confusing native javascript and jQuery, there's no css method on native DOM Element:

function loading(){   
  document.getElementById('container').style.backgroundImage = "none";
}
share|improve this answer
    
thank you, appreciate...the no wrap(head) was my problem all the time, since I did try .style.backgroundImage.... –  Dexter Schneider Aug 23 '12 at 20:35
function loading(){   
  document.getElementById('container').style.backgroundImage = "none";
}
share|improve this answer
    
thank you, appreciate your answer. You're right, I actually tried this before but my fiddle framework was set wrongly –  Dexter Schneider Aug 23 '12 at 20:39

Make sure that your js is loaded in section of your page.

Alternatively, you can only add

$(function() {
$('#container').css("background-image", "none");
}

in your js and remove the onload from body

I am assuming that you are using jquery, else the above solution is the way to go

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The problem is that jsfiddle is set to run your defined javascript onLoad so what I suspect is happening is it encounters your onload= attribute before the loading() method has been defined. If you open up a console you can see an error "Uncaught ReferenceError: loading is not defined" (or something similar).

You can change that to "no wrap (head)" and it should work just fine. Although as mentioned you need to change the css method to something that actually works.

I would say an easier solution would be to just use jquery. It's no longer considered good practice to use the onload handlers of elements (I think they're actually deprecated now?). The best solution is one called "unobtrusive javascript" where any js you execute doesn't require additional javascript or method calls from your html code. I've modified the fiddle to give an example:

http://jsfiddle.net/3pDsJ/38/

share|improve this answer
    
thank you, appreciate...the no wrap(head) was my problem all the time, since I did try .style.backgroundImage.... –  Dexter Schneider Aug 23 '12 at 20:33
    
thank you for your effort –  Dexter Schneider Aug 23 '12 at 20:38

An answer I have not seen yet is that your script tag must be inside your body tag. This is because the script tag must load before the body loads or you will get an error stating that the loading function is not defined.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
    <link rel="stylesheet" href="YourCSS.css" />
</head>
<body onload="loading()">
    <div id="container">
    </div>
    <script type="text/javascript">
        function loading(){   
            $("#container").attr("style", "background-image: none;");
        };
    </script>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
yeah thanks, but was refering to my JSfiddle, on my website I do have it inside the body element –  Dexter Schneider Aug 23 '12 at 20:37
    
Actually the real problem is that the loading() function must be defined before the <body> tag is rendered. Whether you stick it in the <head>, in an external js file and include it from <head> or you just define it in <script> within the body tag (But I'd argue this creates a confusing document and can be difficult to maintain in the future... your js should all be in one easily-located location) –  nzifnab Aug 23 '12 at 20:38
    
@nzifnab The general best practice is to include CSS in the head to eliminate FOUCs, UI scripts right after their elements, and general page scripts at the very end, to speed up page loading times while still making sure that the page can be interacted with at all stages. @DexterSchneider The reason why I showed this here is that when JSFiddle is set to OnLoad (look on the left side), the HTML loads before the JavaScript, giving you an exception since the function loading() hasn't been defined yet. You can set it to PageHead to eliminate this. –  HenryZhang Aug 23 '12 at 20:40
    
We'll have to agree to disagree about UI scripts after their elements, I think this can cause a cluttered DOM and can be difficult to maintain/debug in the future. Especially if the same UI script is used to interact with multiple elements. I think you're right about general page scripts at the end for loading times but unless you're loading external js files I think the additional loading time is likely to be negligible. –  nzifnab Aug 23 '12 at 20:44
    
@nzifnab All JS files should be external, not only for clarity when editing only the HTML, but also to prevent users from as easily messing with them. Especially with PHP and .NET being able to serve JS from a database, this solution is much cleaner and easier to maintain. –  HenryZhang Aug 23 '12 at 20:49

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