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I've been feeling my way around the C# compiler with it's limits of "inherited instantiated generic classes".

Anyway, This is my test case:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var x = new InClass();
        Console.WriteLine(x.Test(10)); //prints foo
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}
class BaseClass<Foo, Bar>
{
    public virtual Foo Test(Bar b)
    {
        return default(Foo);
    }
    public virtual string Test(int b)
    {
        return "foo"; ;
    }
}
class InClass : BaseClass<string, int>
{
    /*public override string Test(int b)
    {
        return "bar";
    }*/
}

I would think that this declaration of InClass would throw a compiler error, as it makes Test ambiguous. It also makes the non-generic Test impossible to call within the InClass. Notice I have some code commented out in InClass as well. If I uncomment that code, I do get a compiler error.

Is there a mention of this behavior at all in the C# spec, or is this an unheard of edge case?

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1  
That's awesome. In the C# spec, I believe it says "Don't do this". –  James Aug 23 '12 at 20:29

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I would think that this declaration of InClass would throw a compiler error, as it makes Test ambiguous.

Nope. The specification calls out this kind of thing explicitly in section 7.5.3.6:

While signatures as declared must be unique, it is possible that substitution of type arguments might result in identical signatures. In such cases, the tie-breaking rules of overload resolution above will pick the most specific member.

The following examples show overloads that are valid and invalid according to this rule.

(Examples follow, obviously.)

So the language designers have considered it, but presumably the alternatives would be worse. (It would be annoying to not be able to create a class such as InClass even when you didn't want to call Test, for example.)

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1  
+1 (See Jon Skeet answer, instinctively click the upvote before reading) –  Matthew Aug 23 '12 at 20:32
    
Well after reading C# In Depth you know the answer is correct if not exhaustive. "=> Pg Xyz in my book for every minutia" –  P.Brian.Mackey Aug 23 '12 at 20:36

See this related question:

Why aren't generic type constraints inheritable/hierarchically enforced

Eric Lippert provides a thorough exploration of the potential implications.

The inherited generic types are not enforced by the compiler because they dev team felt it was a rabbit hole not worth going down.

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My guess is that method with (int x) signature is better match for int argument than one with generic type Bar that happens to be int in this particular case.

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