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I have this that works:

   cars={
        ford:{
            ford_car_one:'Ford Car One',
            ford_car_two:'Ford Car Two'
        },
        toyota:{
            toyota_car_one:'Toyota Car One',
            toyota_car_two:'Toyota Car Two'
        }
    };

    $('#cars_company').on('change', function(){
        $('#cars').html('');
        $.each(cars[$(this).val()], function(k, v){
            $('<option></option>').val(k).text(v)
            .appendTo($('#cars'));
        });
    });

Now how would I perform the $.each(cars[$..... block of code if my javascript object looked like:

cars = [
  { name : 'ford', types: { name : 'ford car one', name : 'ford car 2'},
  { name : 'toyota', types: { name : 'toyota car one', name : 'toyota car 2'},
];

What is the difference between the two car objects?

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5  
Well the fact that the second one is incorrect (duplicate key) should deter you... –  Niet the Dark Absol Aug 23 '12 at 20:56
3  
Why not use an array inside the object instead? { name : 'ford', types: ['ford car one','ford car 2']} –  ahren Aug 23 '12 at 20:57
1  
Object 1 is a valid object but a bad way of declaring it as each car type should propaly not be it's own named property. Object 2 is invalid syntax and after fixing it also does not reuslt in the desired object as the second name : 'ford car 2' and name : 'toyota car 2' over-write the first name values as both properties of the types: object are named name. Fix the object and use an array for types instead and then you can iterate over them as expected, see my answer for full details. –  François Wahl Aug 23 '12 at 21:43

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Question 1

What is the difference between the two car objects?

The difference between the 2 object, if I'm not mistaken, is that the first is an object with other objects as properties inside while the second (ignoring the invalid syntax for now) is an array with 2 elements, each element containing 2 properties.

Object 1

cars={
    ford:{
        ford_car_one:'Ford Car One',
        ford_car_two:'Ford Car Two'
    },
    toyota:{
        toyota_car_one:'Toyota Car One',
        toyota_car_two:'Toyota Car Two'
    }
};

This is an object named cars which has 2 properties, ford and toyota. Each property is another object with 2 properties each. This object looks like this in the console output in chrome:

enter image description here

Object 2

cars = [
  { name : 'ford', types: { name : 'ford car one', name : 'ford car 2'},
  { name : 'toyota', types: { name : 'toyota car one', name : 'toyota car 2'},
];

This instance has messed up syntax and should be (assuming it's current form was intended, though I would not recommend it!)

var cars = [
    {
    name: 'ford',
    types: {
        name: 'ford car one',
        name: 'ford car 2'
    }},
    {
    name: 'toyota',
    types: {
        name: 'toyota car one',
        name: 'toyota car 2'
    }}];

In this instance cars is an array with 2 elements. Each element being an anonymous object with the properties of name and types. types has 2 properties with the same name, which is name, this means the last specified name is overwriting the first name. Resulting in:

enter image description here

As you can see in the results above only ford car 2 and toyota car 2 are left in the inner name property.

DEMO - Showing the output of both current objects.

Question 2

Now how would I perform the $.each(cars[$..... block of code if my javascript object looked like.. object 2 above.

first you have to fix the syntax errors and then most likely re-think how to populate the object, seeing the name property overwrites itself with the next one.

Assuming your object is valid now:

var cars = [
    {
    name: 'ford',
    types: [
        'ford car one',
        'ford car 2'
        ]},
    {
    name: 'toyota',
    types: [
        'toyota car one',
        'toyota car 2'
    ]}];

Resulting in:

enter image description here

You can now do:

$(cars).each(function(){
    // only declared for clarity, not needed, using this is fine.
    var car = this;

    $result.append("- " + car.name + "<br />");

    $(this.types).each(function(){
        // only declared for clarity, not needed, using this is fine.
        var type = this;

        $result.append("-- " + type + "<br />");
    });

    $result.append("<br />");
});

DEMO - Iterating through cars and types using .each() on the suggested object

A side-note on performance. While .each() is fine, you will find that using nested standard for(i=0; i < cars.length; i++), etc. will execute faster. But .each() is perfectly fine and runs fast enough, the difference is minor.

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The below structure you have defined is invalid,

Car Object (from your code):

cars={
    ford:{
        ford_car_one:'Ford Car One',
        ford_car_two:'Ford Car Two'
    },
    toyota:{
        toyota_car_one:'Toyota Car One',
        toyota_car_two:'Toyota Car Two'
    }
};

Car Object: (invalid syntax)

cars = [
  //                         v--- duplicate keys ---v       missing }--v  
  { name : 'ford', types: { name : 'ford car one', name : 'ford car 2'} ,
  { name : 'toyota', types: { name : 'toyota car one', name : 'toyota car 2'} ,
];

Differences between the two car objects

  1. The 2nd structure is syntactically wrong.

    a. Duplicate keys in types. (key name is duplicated inside types object)

    b. Missing }

  2. You are missing the information ford_car_one in your 2nd structure (from 1st structure: ford_car_one:'Ford Car One') This key is used as value for set in the script. ($('<option></option>').val(k))

In case if you planning to change, try this suggested simpler structure below:

cars = {
  'ford': ['ford car one', 'ford car 2'],
  'toyota': ['toyota car one', 'toyota car 2'],
};

Assuming the above suggested structure you need to change the method as below,

$('#cars_company').on('change', function(){
   $('#cars').html('');
   var selVal = $(this).val();

   $.each(cars[selVal ], function(idx, val){
      $('<option></option>')
        .val(idx) //Change val as you want ex: selVal + '_car_' + idx => ford_car_1
        .text(val)
        .appendTo($('#cars'));
   });
});

Changes from your original script...

The option values in your original function was using the key from the object (ex: ford_car_one:'Ford Car One') but your structure didn't had the information so you need to construct the information.. see comment in the above code.

.val(idx) //Change val as you want ex: selVal + '_car_' + idx => ford_car_1
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jQuery.each(cars,function(key,val){
        jQuery.each(val,function(ke2,va2)
           {console.log(va2);
        });
});

Thats how to loop through them both returning.

Your object was not formed correctly it should be like..

var cars = [
    {
        "name": "ford",
        "types": {
            "name": "fordcar2"
        }
    },
    {
        "name": "toyota",
        "types": {
            "name": "toyotacar2"
        }
    }
];

or

[
        {
            "name": "ford",
            "types": ["fordcar2","fordcar4","fordcar3"]


        },
        {
            "name": "toyota",
            "types": ["fordcar2","fordcar4","fordcar3"]
        }
    ];

I would do something like that, this code is only a sample to help you, not to do the work for you!

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Well, if you wanted to do it the plain ole javascript way, it'd be this:

For the first one,

for(var i = 0; i < cars.length(); i++)  //loops through car companies
{
    alert(cars[i] + ":");
    for(var j = 0; i < cars[i].length(); i++)  //loops through models
    {
        alert(cars[i][j]);  //alerts the each *property* of each model, which will be the name of each model
    }
}

The second, you'd do this:

for(var i = 0; i< cars.length(); i++)  //loops through car companies
{
    alert(cars[i].name);
    for(var j = 0; j < cars[i].types.length(); j++)  //loops through car models, but has to use the correct property to do so
    {
        alert(cars[i].types[j]);
    }
}

But note that this would be a ridiculously annoying amount of alerts.

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