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Why does the first method work but not the second?

I'm stumped why I can pass an event to a function using the first method, but not the second. To me these should work identically. Loosely based off of Obtain Mouse Coordinates.

This does work:

document.onclick = function (e) {
  var x = e.pageX;
  var y = e.pageY;
  console.log(x);
};

This does not work. It returns "Uncaught ReferenceError: z is not defined".

document.onclick = mousePosition(z);

function mousePosition (e) {
  var x = e.pageX;
  var y = e.pageY;
  console.log(x);
};
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1  
Z is not defined.. –  Gabriel Santos Aug 24 '12 at 1:07
    
Haha yes, that is why I am getting the error :) –  Donny P Aug 24 '12 at 1:14
    
Yes, I know.. xD –  Gabriel Santos Aug 24 '12 at 1:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Because in the second way you are calling the function and not defining the event action as it. Try this instead:

function mousePosition (e) {
    var x = e.pageX;
    var y = e.pageY;
    console.log(x);
};
document.onclick = function(z){
    mousePosition(z);
}

Or also:

function mousePosition (e) {
    var x = e.pageX;
    var y = e.pageY;
    console.log(x);
};
document.onclick = mousePosition;
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do you need to add the nested closure/function there? couldn't it just be document.onclick = mousePosition, since mousePosition already is a 1-argument function? –  Jeff Tratner Aug 24 '12 at 2:09
    
Yes, but it's just to illustrate the problem –  Danilo Valente Aug 24 '12 at 2:18

The first one you're passing a function reference to the onclick event handler. The second you're attempting to call mousePosition(z) and assign the result to the onclick handler. This is not what you want.

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Thanks Lee, so what do you mean by "passing a function reference to the onclick event handler"? Does this mean the onclick event handler will now execute that function in addition to any other actions? –  Donny P Aug 24 '12 at 1:19
1  
By a reference, it's like saying "when the event happens call the supplied function". This is what you're doing in the first one. The second one you're not passing a reference, you're actually calling the function and passing the result to the onclick handler, which is probably not what you want to do (but could work (depending on what your function returned)) You can daisy chain them, but that's for another day! –  Lee Taylor Aug 24 '12 at 1:26

As the other answers mentioned, your code:

document.onclick = mousePosition(z);

Is calling the mousePosition() function, passing an undefined variable z. What you should do is pass a reference to mousePosition:

document.onclick = mousePosition;   // note: no parentheses

"I'm stumped why I can pass an event to a function using the first method"

In fact you are not passing an event to the function. You are declaring an anonymous function that has one argument named e, and setting document.onclick to reference that function.

When the event occurs, the browser calls your function and it might pass the event object depending on which browser you're using: IE doesn't pass the event object as a parameter, it makes it available via the window.event property.

The browser doesn't care one way or the other whether you've declared the argument explicitly, and in fact even if you don't you can still access any parameters passed in via the arguments object.

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