Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My question refers to setting up the view and the controller for updating a user's "profile" by confirming the password from the user before updating the attributes. As you've all probably seen a million times before, the user would go to /users/:id/edit, enter a new email in the text field, enter the current password in the password field and click on the submit button to ultimately update the user's email. If the password entered is incorrect then the edit template is rendered again, otherwise the user record is updated with the new email and redirected to :show (or whatever is appropriate for the app). While in the update action I think it makes sense to stick with using the update_attributes method. However the current password value would end up throwing us off.

What I'm really asking though is if there's anything wrong with my approach. I ended up with including a call to password_field_tag for the :current_password field inside the form_for block in order to call update_attributes with params[:user] without making attr_accessible angry. But then I looked up a couple forms in websites that already do this (hulu and destroyallsoftware for example) and they seem to accept the :current_password value in the user hash (assuming they're built with rails). Looking up twitter's settings page it looks like they retrieve this in a separate hash in param (so params[:current_password] instead of params[:user][:current_password]).

Is it wrong to use password_field_tag within form_for? How are these other sites really doing this? The only thing I can think of is that they're either deleting :current_password from the params hash or assigning each attribute individually.

Here is what I basically ended up with:

# /app/models/user.rb
class User < Activerecord::Base
  attr_accessible :email, # ...
  # ...
end

# /app/views/users/edit.html.erb
<%= form_for @user do |f| %>
  # this is stored in params[:user][:email]
  <%= f.label :email, 'Your new email' %>
  <%= f.text_field :email, type: :email %>

  # this is stored in params[:current_password]
  <%= label_tag :current_password, 'Re-enter your password to update your email' %>
  <%= password_field_tag :current_password %>

  <%= f.submit 'Save changes' %>
<% end %>

# /app/controllers/users_controller.rb
# ...
def update
  @user = User.find(params[:id])
  if @user.authenticate(params[:current_password])
    if @user.update_attributes(params[:user])
      sign_in @user
      flash[:success] = 'Sweet!'
      redirect_to @user
    else
      render :edit
    end
  else
    flash.now[:error] = 'Incorrect password'
    render :edit
  end

Otherwise, this is the one other way I thought of:

# /app/views/users/edit.html.erb
<%= form_for @user do |f| %>
  # this is stored in params[:user][:email]
  <%= f.label :email, 'Your new email' %>
  <%= f.text_field :email, type: :email %>

  # this is stored in params[:user][:current_password]
  <%= f.label :current_password, 'Re-enter your password to update your email' %>
  <%= f.password_field :current_password %>

  <%= f.submit 'Save changes' %>
<% end %>

# /app/controllers/users_controller.rb
# ...
def update
  @user = User.find(params[:id])
  if @user.authenticate(params[:user][:current_password])
    params[:user].delete(:current_password) # <-- this makes me feel a bit uneasy
    if @user.update_attributes(params[:user])
      sign_in @user
      flash[:success] = 'Sweet!'
      redirect_to @user
    else
      render :edit
    end
  else
    flash.now[:error] = 'Incorrect password'
    render :edit
  end

Or, should I just do this in the controller?:

def update
  @user = User.find(params[:id])
  if @user.authenticate(params[:user][:current_password])
    @user.email = params[:user][:email]
    if @user.save
      # ...

Any advice is appreciated.

P.S. - Additionally how would you go about refactoring that update action? I tried out a before_filter to authenticate with :current_password and keep only the #update_attributes part in #update, but it got a bit messy. This post is getting long enough though so maybe I'll post this as a separate question if I can not figure it out by next week.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

I've recently done something similar to this, except I used a virtual attribute to handle the current_password. You can then add the :current_password attribute to attr_accessible and keep it happy.

share|improve this answer
    
I've thought of that as well and it indeed "works." But I'm not sure how I feel about adding an accessor just to get something working in the update action. Even though it is virtual I don't think it warrants adding a new attribute to the model just yet. –  user1458663 Aug 25 '12 at 0:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.