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I have list of start dates, and a list of end dates. They're sorted...

start_dates = [
    datetime.date(2009, 11, 5), datetime.date(2009, 11, 13), 
    datetime.date(2009, 11, 25), datetime.date(2009, 11, 26), 
    datetime.date(2009, 12, 4), datetime.date(2009, 12, 7), 
    datetime.date(2009, 12, 29), datetime.date(2009, 12, 30)]

end_dates = [
    datetime.date(2009, 10, 1), datetime.date(2009, 10, 2), 
    datetime.date(2009, 10, 9), datetime.date(2009, 10, 12), 
    datetime.date(2009, 11, 4), datetime.date(2009, 12, 14), 
    datetime.date(2009, 12, 15)]

We want a sequence of time periods which use a start_date to start a period and an end_date to end the period. The time periods can't overlap: each period must end before the next one starts, nor start on the day the last one ended. If, at the end, there is a start_date with no suitable end_date to match, use None as the final end date.

Thus the input above generates:

result = (
  (datetime.date(2009, 11, 5), datetime.date(2009, 12, 14)),
  (datetime.date(2009, 12, 29), None)
)

I'm using for-loops inside for-loops and wonder if there is not a better way. Performance is of interest since it will be applied to thousands of scenarios over a 40 year span; some of the lists involve thousands of dates.

X----

To be honest I'm surprised people are having so much trouble understanding the problem... I'll try again by revealing the application, perhaps the abstraction is making it hard to visualize...

The start dates represent dates on which we receive advice to buy a share. The end dates are dates on which which we received advice to sell it. The sources of advice are different and we are backtesting what would happen if we used the buy advice from one source, but the sell advice from another. Thus we have two sequences of dates which we want to resolve into pairs - or intervals - over which we would have held a position in the stock.

Thus we take a date from the start_dates buy the stock. So on Nov 5 we buy a position. Now we work through the end_dates looking for when we would've first been told to sell it - Dec 14. Now repeat by waiting the buy advice, then the sell advice. So you alternate the lists to get a logical sequence of date pairs. If at the end we're holding an open position we note that by using None or supplying a special date to close with.

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1  
How dose the result look that you want to achieve. Its hard to say just from the question how you want this to turn out –  Pablo Karlsson Aug 24 '12 at 3:38
    
@PabloKarlsson I believe the desired result is already specified in the question?! It's a list of date tuples. –  John Mee Aug 24 '12 at 3:41
    
Yes it is but How do I map them (start_dates[1],end_dates[1])? –  Pablo Karlsson Aug 24 '12 at 3:45
    
@PabloKarlsson Sorry, you didn't follow. I elaborated on the q for you. –  John Mee Aug 24 '12 at 4:03
    
No problem I think I have provided an answer hope it suites you.. –  Pablo Karlsson Aug 24 '12 at 4:06

4 Answers 4

How about this.

all_dates = start_dates.expand(end_dates)
all_dates.sort()

look_for_start = 1;
date = []
start_date = None
end_date = None
for i in range(len(all_dates)):
   if look_for_start and all_dates[i] in start_dates:
     start_date = all_dates[i]
     look_for_start = 0;

   elsif !look_for_start and all_dates[i] in end_dates:
     end_date = all_dates[1]
     look_for_start = 1;

   if start_date == end_date:
     end_date == None
     look_for_start = 0;

   if start_date != None and end_date != None;
     date.append((start_date,end_date))
     start_date = None
     end_date = None

After this you have start_dates with end dates as far as possible. just take the remaining set of start_dates and get set their end date to None

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There is no expand method on lists, I think you meant extend. And this does not produce the desired output. –  sberry Aug 24 '12 at 4:05
    
Thanks im confused by the multitude of languages I use.. –  Pablo Karlsson Aug 24 '12 at 4:07
    
This still does not create the desired output though? –  sberry Aug 24 '12 at 4:13
    
I think I had misunderstood what was requested. This i think should solve the problem rather efficiently. –  Pablo Karlsson Aug 24 '12 at 4:38

Edit

This should scale with len(start_dates)+len(end_dates):

def date_range(start_dates, end_dates):
    result = []

    start_i = 0
    end_i = 0

    while start_i<len(start_dates):
        while end_i<len(end_dates) and start_dates[start_i]>end_dates[end_i]:
            end_i += 1
        if end_i == len(end_dates):
            result.append((start_dates[start_i], None))
            break
        result.append((start_dates[start_i], end_dates[end_i]))
        while start_i<len(start_dates) and start_dates[start_i]<=end_dates[end_i]:
            start_i += 1
        end_i += 1

    return result

Usage:

In  : start_dates = [
   ....:     datetime.date(2009, 11, 5), datetime.date(2009, 11, 13),
   ....:     datetime.date(2009, 11, 25), datetime.date(2009, 11, 26),
   ....:     datetime.date(2009, 12, 4), datetime.date(2009, 12, 7),
   ....:     datetime.date(2009, 12, 29), datetime.date(2009, 12, 30)]

In : end_dates = [
   ....:     datetime.date(2009, 10, 1), datetime.date(2009, 10, 2),
   ....:     datetime.date(2009, 10, 9), datetime.date(2009, 10, 12),
   ....:     datetime.date(2009, 11, 4), datetime.date(2009, 12, 14),
   ....:     datetime.date(2009, 12, 15)]

In : date_range(start_dates, end_dates)
Out:
[(datetime.date(2009, 11, 5), datetime.date(2009, 12, 14)),
 (datetime.date(2009, 12, 29), None)]

In : start_dates = [
   ....:     datetime.date(2009, 11, 5), datetime.date(2009, 11, 13),
   ....:     datetime.date(2009, 11, 25), datetime.date(2009, 11, 26),
   ....:     datetime.date(2009, 12, 4), datetime.date(2009, 12, 7),
   ....:     datetime.date(2009, 12, 29), datetime.date(2009, 12, 30)]

In : end_dates = [
   ....:     datetime.date(2009, 10, 1), datetime.date(2009, 10, 2),
   ....:     datetime.date(2009, 10, 9), datetime.date(2009, 10, 12),
   ....:     datetime.date(2009, 11, 7), datetime.date(2009, 12, 14), # changed (2009, 11, 4) -> (2009, 11, 7)
   ....:     datetime.date(2009, 12, 15)]

In : date_range(start_dates, end_dates)
Out:
[(datetime.date(2009, 11, 5), datetime.date(2009, 11, 7)),
 (datetime.date(2009, 11, 13), datetime.date(2009, 12, 14)),
 (datetime.date(2009, 12, 29), None)]
share|improve this answer
    
Nice. Although I'm still trying to grok how it works. –  John Mee Aug 24 '12 at 4:44
    
I am wondering, because I may have misunderstood the problem... if you change the end date from 2009-11-04 to 2009-11-07, what would the expect output be? This answer would lead to the same result. –  sberry Aug 24 '12 at 4:53
    
That's correct. The answer would not change. –  John Mee Aug 24 '12 at 5:00
    
@JohnMee: Corrected. This should be still better than a nested for loop. –  Avaris Aug 24 '12 at 5:15
    
beat me to it. that's the pattern I was working on before getting distracted to edit the question... although now I'm dwelling on the realisation that it just alternates the lists as it searches. hmm. –  John Mee Aug 24 '12 at 5:23

I think this should work to get the date tuple, but I cant suggest you the way without using for loop, because it might get more complicated instead.

The logic is pretty simple and obvious though.

result = []
for startd in start_dates:
    if not result or result[-1][1] is not None and startd>result[-1][1]:
    #can use 'len(result)==0' instead of 'not result'
        for endd in end_dates:
            if endd>startd:
                result.append((startd,endd))
                break
        else:
            result.append((start,None))
    if result[-1][1] is None:
        break

result = tuple(result)
print result
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I've finally nailed it down to:

    trades = []
    enddate = datetime.date(1900, 1, 1)
    try:
        for startdate in startdates:
            if enddate <= startdate:
                enddate = enddates.next()
                while enddate <= startdate:
                    enddate = enddates.next()
                trades.append((startdate, enddate))
    except StopIteration:
        trades.append((startdate, None))

Thanks to those who asked questions and answered. For no rational reason this little puzzle became a fixation for me but I think finally I have done this to death and should move on with my life. It's really very simple in the end - astonishing how much work it took to make it this plain!

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