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I'm trying to get my head around Cassandra's DB model, but I'm not having much luck. Almost all of the documentation out there is either explaining Twissandra, a twitter-clone, but it's actually a fairly simple case, and doesn't really help with learning how to use Cassandra effectively; or it's very basic low level stuff that doesn't really show what you'd typically do with columns/super-columns in a real world situation.

So I thought a forum would be a sufficiently complex application to learn from. Assume a web-forum somewhat like phpBB; you can have multiple Forums, each of which displays multiple Topics, and every topic has multiple Posts to it.

I first thought of having separate Posts, Topics and Forums columns, but that seemed no-different to the way in which I'd implement this on an RDBMS.

So now I'm wondering how deep the nesting can be in super-column families. Is something like the following pseudo-model an appropriate way of modelling this?

Forums = {
    forum001: {
        name: "General News",
        topics: {
            topic000001: {
                subject: "This is what I think",
                date: "2012-08-24 10:12:13",
                posts: {
                    post20120824.101213: { username: "tom", content: "Blah blah", datetime: "2012-08-24 10:12:13" }
                    post20120824.101513: { username: "dick", content: "Blah blah blah", datetime: "2012-08-24 10:15:13" }
                    post20120824.103213: { username: "harry", content: "Blah blah", datetime: "2012-08-24 10:32:13" }
                }
            },
            topic000002: {
                subject: "OMG Look at this",
                date: "2012-08-24 10:42:13",
                posts: {
                    post20120824.104213: { username: "tom", content: "Blah blah", datetime: "2012-08-24 10:42:13" }
                    post20120824.104523: { username: "dick", content: "Blah blah blah", datetime: "2012-08-24 10:45:23" }
                    post20120824.104821: { username: "harry", content: "Blah blah", datetime: "2012-08-24 10:48:21" }
                }
            }
        }
    },
    forum002: {
        name: "Specific News",
        topics: {
            topic000003: {
                subject: "Whinge whine",
                date: "2012-08-24 10:12:13",
                posts: {
                    post20120824.101213: { username: "tom", content: "Blah blah", datetime: "2012-08-24 10:12:13" }
                    post20120824.101513: { username: "dick", content: "Blah blah blah", datetime: "2012-08-24 10:15:13" }
                }
            }
        }
    }
}
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3  
I'd start by thinking about how you'd want to query the data. For example, do you want to find all the posts by a given user in a certain date range or do you want to list all of the posts for a given topic, etc. The queries drive the model more than anything else. –  Chris Gerken Aug 24 '12 at 16:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted
  1. You can't have that level of nesting unless you're writing JSON docs that you don't intend to query directly.
  2. You shouldn't use supercolumns because they are deprecated.
  3. Chris's comment on your question is absolutely correct: the first order of business is to ask yourself how you intend to query the data, then write like you intend to read. Sometimes this means writing more than one way (i.e. normalization is not the goal).
  4. You can get additional "nesting" by using composite keys and/or columns.
  5. Since you can only query by key & column range, or using secondary indexes, you'll often need to write your own indexes for columns that aren't good candidates for secondaries (i.e. have high cardinality).

I know these rules don't give you a model, but your model is completely query-dependent. It's a different way of looking at the world than an RDBMS. If you really need ad hoc query support (many use cases really don't), Cassandra isn't the right choice.

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