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In the following sample, is there a magic word I can put in place of <ChildClass> that works like the opposite of super?

class Parent(object):

    def __init__(self):
        print <ChildClass>.x

class someChild(Parent):
    x = 10

It is a stupid example, but it shows my intention. By the way, using someChild will not work, because there are many child classes.

The only solution I can think of is to have a constructor in every child class that calls the constructor of Parent with a reference to itself (or even to pass x), but I would like to avoid having a constructor at all in each child.

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1  
Maybe I'm missing something, but this shouldn't be possible because a parent can have many chidren. –  xbonez Aug 24 '12 at 5:24
1  
@xbonez: I think he means when a single child class calls Parent.__init__, as in my example below. –  David Robinson Aug 24 '12 at 5:25
    
@xbonez: Sorry I should have mentioned that the Parent class is never used by itself, it is only for subclassing. –  John Peters Aug 24 '12 at 5:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

What is wrong with just using self.x?

class Parent(object):
    x = None  # default value
    def __init__(self):
        print self.x

class someChild(Parent):
    x = 10
    def __init__(self):
        Parent.__init__(self)

class otherChild(Parent):
    x = 20
    def __init__(self):
        Parent.__init__(self)

a = someChild()
# output: 10
b = otherChild()
# output: 20

Note how this works even if Parent has a class attribute x as well (None in the above example)- the child's takes precedence.

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1  
Sometimes life can be simple :) Thanks! –  John Peters Aug 24 '12 at 5:35

self.x will work if the instance doesn't have an x attribute.

type(self).x if the instance has an x attribute and you want the class's value, essentially skipping over the instance.

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