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I need to make a copy of GameMaster* thisMaster so I can preform manipulations while still maintaining a "clean" copy. However, the way I'm doing it right now, when I make a change to copy, it changes thisMaster too.

void Move::possibleMoves(GameMaster* thisMaster)
{
     GameMaster* copy = new GameMaster(*thisMaster);
}

How can I fix this?

edit: I created a copy constructor but am still having the same issue.

GameMaster::GameMaster(const GameMaster& gm)
{
    for(int i=0;i<GAMETILES;i++)
    {
        gameTiles[i]=gm.gameTiles[i];
    }
    players=gm.players;
    vertLines=gm.vertLines;
    horLines=gm.horLines;
    turn = gm.turn;
    masterBoard=gm.masterBoard;
    lastLegal=gm.lastLegal;
    lastScore=gm.lastScore;
}

Here is the complete class definition for GameMaster:

Class GameMaster
{
public:
    GameMaster(void);
    GameMaster(const GameMaster& gm);
    ~GameMaster(void);
    //functions

private:
    std::vector <Player*> players;
    std::vector <Line> vertLines;
    std::vector <Line> horLines;
    Tile gameTiles [GAMETILES];
    std::vector <std::string>colors;
    std::vector <std::string>shapes;
    int turn;
    Board masterBoard;
    bool lastLegal;
    int lastScore;
};

With the copy constructor, I am still having the issue with the Board changing values. Does it need a copy constructor too?

share|improve this question
5  
Chances are your copy constructor is shallow-copying a member pointer that you use to make your comparison. As a side note, is that local pointer necessary? Why not GameMaster copy (*thisMaster);? –  chris Aug 24 '12 at 5:48
1  
It would be very helpful to post the declaration of your GameMaster class, and the implementation of your copy constructor. –  razlebe Aug 24 '12 at 5:50
    
@AndrésSenac, Not unless it's implemented correctly. Anyway, why bother writing one? Adhere to the Rule of Zero and you'll save yourself some code and possible memory issues such as this one. –  chris Aug 24 '12 at 5:51
    
@chris Sorry, I'm a bit new to C++. I didn't know I had to make a copy constructor, so I guess I'm using the default one. Do I need a copy constructor? Also, I made a new local one because I was having a stack overflow before. –  user1599559 Aug 24 '12 at 5:56
    
@Kyryx, Stack overflow? Either you have some other problem, or that is one big set of classes. Judging from the function name, though, if this is an AI calling possibleMoves a lot in order to decide where to go, that would make sense. For information on the why (and how), see this question on the Rule of Three. In the long run, the rule of zero has better results, though. –  chris Aug 24 '12 at 6:00
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted
Class GameMaster
{
public:
    GameMaster(void);
    GameMaster(const GameMaster& gm);
    ~GameMaster(void);
    //functions

private:
    std::vector <Player*> players; // You should make a deep copy because of pointers
    std::vector <Line> vertLines; // Shallow copy is OK if Line doesn't have pointers in it
    std::vector <Line> horLines; // see above
    Tile gameTiles [GAMETILES]; // One by one assignment is OK
    std::vector <std::string>colors; // Shallow copy is OK
    std::vector <std::string>shapes; // Shallow copy is OK
    int turn; // assignment is OK
    Board masterBoard; // same questions for GameMaster still exists for copying this
    bool lastLegal; // assignment is OK
    int lastScore; // assignment is OK
};

Here is link for Shallow vs Deep copy

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the help, reading up on deep copy now. I am assuming for Board I want to give it a copy assignment operator, because I am using = right? –  user1599559 Aug 24 '12 at 6:50
    
Not exactly, the problem of masterBoard is if it contains vectors of pointers or pointers like in the situation of GameMaster class then you should write the copy constructor for it, too. I assume you want a deep copy of the masterBoard class, if it's not the situation you can simply shallow copy it without implementing its copy constructor. –  Seçkin Savaşçı Aug 24 '12 at 6:52
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players=gm.players;

is only copying the collection of pointers.. you will need to do a deep copy of the players in the new vector.

edit

for( auto iter = gm.players.begin(); iter != gm.players.end(); ++iter) 
{
   players.push_back(new Players(*iter))
}

you will also need to have a copy const for Players.

cheers

share|improve this answer
    
I thought it might be something like that. I'm sorry, I'm not familiar with what a deep copy is. How do I do one? –  user1599559 Aug 24 '12 at 6:45
    
just replace players=gm.players with code above –  jaybny Aug 24 '12 at 6:56
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