Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an Mvc3 project that includes both Mvc and Api controllers. When I run the application without specifying the "controller/action", the "Default" route is selected and the "home/index" page is rendered. When that page runs, an Ajax call is made using url: "api/controller", returning json, which is then used to populate a table on the page.

 <script type="text/javascript">
     $(function () {
         var $products = $("#products");
         $.ajax({
             url: "api/products",
             contentType: "json",
             success: function (data) {
                 $.each(data, function (index, item) {
                     $products.append("<tr><td>" + item.ProductCode + "</td>" +
                                         "<td>" + item.Description + "</td>");
                 });
             }
         });
     });
 </script>

However, when a request is made to the same page specifying the "controller/action", as in "localhost/home/index", the Ajax call is translated to "/home/api/controller" and of course the request cannot complete or return any results, since the ApiController cannot be found.

    public static void RegisterRoutes(RouteCollection routes) {
        routes.IgnoreRoute("{resource}.axd/{*pathInfo}");

        routes.MapHttpRoute(
           "DefaultApi",
           "api/{controller}/{id}",
           new { id = RouteParameter.Optional }
        );

        routes.MapRoute(
            "Default", // Route name
            "{controller}/{action}/{id}", // URL with parameters
            new { controller = "Home", action = "Index", id = UrlParameter.Optional } 
        );
    }

Considering that it must be a routing issue, I proceeded to resolve this by adding a route:

        routes.MapHttpRoute(
           "HomeApi",
           "home/api/{controller}/{id}",
           new { id = RouteParameter.Optional }
        );

This was successful. As was my next change to:

        routes.MapHttpRoute(
           "AnyApi",
           "{folder}/api/{controller}/{id}",
           new { id = RouteParameter.Optional }
        );

Which also works but leaves me somewhat skeptical as to whether it is the correct way to handle combining WebApi with Mvc.

Is this the correct way to handle this? Or are there better alternatives?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Considering that it must be a routing issue, I proceeded to resolve this by adding a route:

No, that's not a routing issue at all. Your routes are perfectly fine:

public static void RegisterRoutes(RouteCollection routes) {
    routes.IgnoreRoute("{resource}.axd/{*pathInfo}");

    routes.MapHttpRoute(
       "DefaultApi",
       "api/{controller}/{id}",
       new { id = RouteParameter.Optional }
    );

    routes.MapRoute(
        "Default", // Route name
        "{controller}/{action}/{id}", // URL with parameters
        new { controller = "Home", action = "Index", id = UrlParameter.Optional } 
    );
}

Your issue stems from the fact that you have hardcoded the url in your javascript instead of using url helpers to generate it. You should absolutely never hardcode an url inside an ASP.NET MVC application. You should always use url helpers.

So:

<script type="text/javascript">
    $(function () {
        var $products = $("#products");
        var url = '@Url.RouteUrl("DefaultApi", new { httproute = "", controller = "products" })';
        $.ajax({
            url: url,
            success: function (data) {
                $.each(data, function (index, item) {
                    $products.append("<tr><td>" + item.ProductCode + "</td>" +
                                         "<td>" + item.Description + "</td>");
                });
            }
        });
    });
</script>

Also notice that I have removed the contentType: 'json' from your AJAX call because first the correct content type is contentType: 'application/json' and second in this case you are not sending any data in the request, so you shouldn't be setting it to application/json.

share|improve this answer

There's no need to add a route there -- you can specify the API URL so that it will always work:

/api/controller

In some cases you may need to use the Url.RouteUrl helper to create URLs explicitly based on the route (by route name and/or route values). For example, this would specify the route named "DefaultApi" with controller=products:

@Url.RouteUrl("DefaultApi", new { controller = "products" })
share|improve this answer
    
In some cases you may need to use the Url.RouteUrl helper to create URLs. I wold rather say: in all cases. Also see my answer for the correct way to use it with a Web API route. –  Darin Dimitrov Aug 24 '12 at 6:14
    
@DarinDimitrov fair enough... sicne if you use /api/products, then if the site gets deployed to domain.com/application, then all links coded like that would be broken. –  McGarnagle Aug 24 '12 at 6:17
1  
that's only one of the reasons. Another important reason is that you are assuming in your client code the pattern of the routes. And if one day someone decides to change it in the RegisterRoutes to say: "mysuperapi-{controller}-{id}", you will now have to go through all your views and replace /api/controller/123 with /mysuperapi-controller-123. –  Darin Dimitrov Aug 24 '12 at 6:23

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.