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My assignment is

"My dog, named Buddy, lives in the backyard. He barks at night when he sees a cat or a squirrel that has come to visit. If he sees a frog, and he is hungry, he eats it. If he sees a frog and he isn't hungry, he plays with it. If he has eaten 2 frogs already, and is still hungry, he will let it go. If he sees a coyote, he crys for help. Sometime his friend Spot stops by, and they chase each other. If he sees any other animal, he simply watches it.

Write one test program and a set of classes that keeps track of all of the backyard activity and stores the results into a file for a given night. I would expect that you would have an animal class, and a cat, dog, squirrel, coyote class that inherits from the animal class. You would need to keep track of how many frogs he has eaten, how many animals of each type has come and visited, how often he has played and other such details. "

You will also need to write a test program that will read the file that was generated from the other test program, and print out how many animals of each type that he has seen, what he has done with them on a particular day. The user will need to enter in the date, and the information from the file for that date will be read in, and displayed.

Add in any other capability to the program that you need so it covers all of the required programming concepts listed. Be creative with this assignment.

-We are to use classes, data abstraction, inheritance, composition, pointers, operator overloading, and exception handling.-

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>

using namespace std;

class animal{
public:
       animal();
       ~animal();
       void interactWithBuddy(); 
       virtual int ID()
        {
          return ID;
        }
 };
class frog: public animal
{
     public:
            void interactWithBuddy();
            void eat();
            void play();
            void letGo();

};
class dog: public animal
{      
       public:
              void interactWithBuddy();
              void chase();

};
class cat: public animal
{
      public:
             void interactWithBuddy();
             void bark();
};
class coyote: public animal
{
      public:
             void interactWithBuddy();
             void cryForHelp();
};
class squirrel: public animal
{
      public:
             void interactWithBuddy();
             void bark();
};
class otherAnimal: public animal
{
      public:
             void interactWithBuddy();
             void watch();
};
int main ()
{
    srand(time(0)); 
    int number; 
      std::cout << (rand() % 6 + 1) <<std::endl;   
    animal * a = new frog(); 
        int z = a->ID(); 
    animal * b = new dog();
         int y = a->ID();
    animal * c = new cat();
         int x = a->ID();
    animal * d = new coyote();
         int w = a->ID();
    animal * e = new squirrel();
         int v = a->ID();
    animal * f = new otherAnimal();
         int u = a->ID();         
    return 0;
}

I know the code is just a shell but am I on the right track? How would you suggest counting the frogs and figuring whether they get eaten, played with, or let go? Also I want to assign each animal subclass a number in which I can then randomize in the main function so as to correlate with the assignment but I am unsure as to how that would be done. Tips and pointers would be greatly welcome.

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3  
why do the squirrel barks? –  mirt Aug 24 '12 at 6:47
    
have a look for Discrete Event Simulation –  Seçkin Savaşçı Aug 24 '12 at 7:20
    
@mirt They don't. But the way they perform their non-barking is by overriding the general barking of all animals. Or so it would seem. –  jogojapan Aug 24 '12 at 7:23

2 Answers 2

You are putting too much into the base class. Not all animals can do all the stuff that others can as well. Your animal class should only contain stuff that any animal can have/do. All the stuff that is specific for a concrete animal (i.e. a dog or a frog) should be placed into the corresponding class. For example, not every animal can bark(), definitely, so this function should not be in the base class.

How would you suggest counting the frogs and figuring whether they get eaten, played with, or let go?

Well since its the dog who can see the frogs, it would make sense to put a counter into the dog class.

Also I want to assign each animal subclass a number in which I can then randomize in the main function so as to correlate with the assignment but I am unsure as to how that would be done.

I didn't quite understand what do you mean here. Do you mean that you want to make identifiers for each class? If yes, why would you need to do it?

UPD:

Yes that's a right approach. The easiest way is to assign numbers from 1 to 6 for each animal, and then when you need to determine which one appears, generate a random number in the range of [1,6]. To assign numbers to the animals, you should add a field like int id; and assign different values to it in each class.

UDP 2:

This is where polymorphism comes into play. First of all, to initialize a const member for a class, you need to make it static. Here's a simple example:

class base
{
public:
    static const int ID = -1;
};

class derived: public base
{
public:
    static const int ID = 1;
};

Now every object of the base class will have an ID of -1, and every object of the derived class will have an ID of 1. However, if you try to use it from a base-class-pointer like this:

base * a = new derived();
int t = a->ID;

you will always be getting -1, since the base class pointer doesn't know what is it pointing it. To get a correct ID you will need to make a virtual function:

virtual int getId(){ return ID; }

Now if you will do

base * a = new derived();
int t = a->getID();

you will always get the right ID from the "real" type a points at.

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Okay first comment makes sense thanks, I will fix that right away. The second question is that part of the assignment is that the animals randomly walk into the dogs yard...its either another dog, a frog, squirrel, cat, coyote, or other animal and the dog "buddy" interact differently with each. So I was thinking if I assigned the subclass a number i.e. frog then in the main function I can call it in a random number loop to record what type of animal it is and therefore what interaction with "buddy" it would have. Hopefully I didn't just make that more confusing. –  Angie Aug 24 '12 at 6:39
    
@Angie, updated my answer –  SingerOfTheFall Aug 24 '12 at 6:52
    
I am now getting an error that reads "ISO C++ forbids initialization of member "animalID" making 'animalID' static ISO C++ forbids in-class initialization of non-const static member 'animalID'--what they hey does that mean?? That is a new one on me. I declared it under my first class <code> class frog: public animal { private: animalID = 1;} <endCode> –  Angie Aug 24 '12 at 7:15
    
@Angie, updated again –  SingerOfTheFall Aug 24 '12 at 7:22
    
okay I updated my code so it is as current as I have it right now. I am so lost on this virtual abstraction and I think my brain is fried after the long day sorry. I think I got what you were telling me but now I have new error stating "in member function 'virtual int animal:ID()': arguement of type 'int(animal::)()' does not match 'int'-again no idea what this is trying to tell me. –  Angie Aug 24 '12 at 7:40

I suggest you put the random logic outside the tool... separation of concerns. Then you can have one program that just reads a series of animal names from standard input, performs the actions and records whatever it needs, then when it detects end-of-file prints a summary report. You can test it simply as in:

echo cat frog frog squirrel frog | buddy_simulator

If you want, you can then create a program to randomise some input.

The basic logic should be:

std::string animal_name;
while (std::cin >> animal_name)
{
    // do something animal_specific
}
// do reporting

The animal specific behaviour could be created using a factory method accepting the animal_name paramter and returning an appropriate Animal* to a newly heap allocated animal object. You could then call p->suffer_buddy();, which would update a static member "times this animal's been seen" counter, print out what buddy likes to do (on this sighting). If it's the first time that animal's been seen, you could store the pointer into a vector in main(), so that when you want to do a summary report, you could call p->report() for each animal type you've encountered. Frog::report(), for example, might be something like:

void Frog::report()
{
    std::cout << "of " << count_ << " frogs, " << eaten_ << " eaten, " << played_with_ << " played with, " << let_go_ << " let go\n";
}

It's a bit ugly to use so many static variables, but it's easier to make it work like this.

(Unfortunately, the behaviour's badly specified - how do you decide whether buddy's hungry? That's no specified at all, so you have to make some assumptions (and document them) or ask your teacher to specify this.)

This is all pretty stupid, but then so is modelling this problem using a polymorphic hierarchy, so there you go....

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