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I am using .on method in jquery instead of .live.

$(function(){

$('.mydiv').live('click', function(){ //my code})

})

$(function(){

$('.mydiv').on('click','/*selector*/', function(){ //my code})

})

I want to know that what to put into selector in .on function. I want to apply function on 'mydiv'

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closed as not a real question by undefined, amit, adeneo, casperOne Aug 24 '12 at 13:05

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
jQuery has a good api. api.jquery.com/on –  undefined Aug 24 '12 at 6:56
1  
-1 Try reading the documentation? Then, if there are any remaining/specific questions, then please post those - with more focus/refinement. –  user166390 Aug 24 '12 at 6:56
    
Actually in this case the doco for .live() is a good place to look since it explains exactly how to convert existing .live() calls over to .on() (or .delegate()). –  nnnnnn Aug 24 '12 at 7:07

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted
$(function(){
    $(document).on('click','.mydiv', function(){ //my code});
});

When delegating events you listen for any click on an element that exists on the time of binding, as event handlers can only be attached to elements that actually exists in the DOM on the time of binding, this would be the first element in the statement above, and then it checks to see if the target (the one that was clicked) element matches the element you're really listening for, the second element in the statement above. document always exists, but using an element closer to the actual element would be better.

It listens for any click on the document, which is the entire page as all elements are within the document, and then checks to see if the click originated from the second element in the statement, and if it did it fires the function. Obviously the closer you get to the actual element the fewer elements will fire the click function and be filtered out.

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From the jquery documentation: selector: A selector string to filter the descendants of the selected elements that trigger the event. If the selector is null or omitted, the event is always triggered when it reaches the selected element.

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api.jquery.com/on –  Shree Aug 24 '12 at 6:55

TRY

$(function(){    
    $(document).on('click','.mydiv', function(){ 
      //your code
     })    
})

Reference

blog of explanation

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.on( events [, selector] [, data], handler(eventObject) )

events One or more space-separated event types and optional namespaces, such as "click" or "keydown.myPlugin". selector A selector string to filter the descendants of the selected elements that trigger the event. If the selector is null or omitted, the event is always triggered when it reaches the selected element. data Data to be passed to the handler in event.data when an event is triggered. handler (eventObject)A function to execute when the event is triggered. The value false is also allowed as a shorthand for a function that simply does return false;

$("#dataTable tbody tr").on("click", function(event){
    alert($(this).text());
});


$("#dataTable tbody").on("click", "tr", function(event){
    alert($(this).text());
});
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As a starting point, always take a look at the Jquery API for this function.

A possible use:

$('.parent').on('click','.child', function(){
//code
})

This video might give you a nice overview

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