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I've several objects extending a bean:

public class Fruit {}

public class Banana extends Fruit {}

public class Pear extends Fruit {}

And I've an Interface with different implementation, one for each bean.

public interface Milkshake {
    public String doMilkshake();
}

public class FruitMilkshake implements Milkshake {
    public String doMilkshake() {
        return "Fruit Milkshake!";
    }
}

public class BananaMilkshake implements Milkshake {
    public String doMilkshake() {
        return "Banana Milkshake!";
    }
}

public class PearMilkshake implements Milkshake {
    public String doMilkshake() {
        return "Pear Milkshake!";
    }
}

How can I instantiate the correct implementation based on the concrete type of my bean?

For now I've used typization, and a Map to "map" the correct implementation. Like this:

public void hungry(Fruit fruit) {
    Map<String, String> obj2impl = new HashMap<String, String>();
    obj2impl.put("Fruit", "FruitMilkshake");
    obj2impl.put("Banana", "BananaMilkshake");
    obj2impl.put("Pear", "PearMilkshake");

    String name = fruit.getClass().getCanonicalName();
    String implName = obj2impl.get(name);
    Milkshake milkshake = (Milkshake) Class.forName(implName).newInstance();

    milkshake.doMilkshake(fruit);
}



public interface Milkshake <T t> {
    public String doMilkshake(T t);
}

public class FruitMilkshake implements Milkshake<Fruit> {
    public String doMilkshake(Fruit fruit) {
        return "Fruit Milkshake!";
    }
}

public class BananaMilkshake implements Milkshake<Banana> {
    public String doMilkshake(Banana banana) {
        return "Banana Milkshake!";
    }
}

public class PearMilkshake implements Milkshake<Pear> {
    public String doMilkshake(Pear pear) {
        return "Pear Milkshake!";
    }
}

Better ways to achieve this?

share|improve this question
    
You should not recreate the fruit map on every invocation of hungry. Put that map as an instance variable instead. Or switch on the fruit name. –  maba Aug 24 '12 at 7:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Better ways to achieve this?

Well a starting point would be to avoid reflecting on the name of the class:

Map<String, Class<? extends Milkshake>> obj2impl =
    new HashMap<String, Class<? extends Milkshake>>();
obj2impl.put("Fruit", FruitMilkshake.class);
obj2impl.put("Banana", BananaMilkshake.class);

...

Milkshake milkshake = obj2impl.get(text).newInstance();

Now that still requires you to have a parameterless constructor in each implementation, and it still always creates a new instance. If you use a Provider-like concept, you can get round this:

Map<String, Provider<Milkshake>> map = ...;
// Fill the map with providers, some of which could create a new instance,
// and some could reuse an existing one

...

Milkshake milkshake = map.get(text).get();

EDIT: Having reread the post, you can get rid of the text part as well, and have a Map<Class<?>, Provider<Milkshake>>. Avoid hard-coding the names of classes if possible.

Of course, if your Fruit class had a makeMilkshake abstract method, that would be even nicer...

share|improve this answer
    
I'm obviously not using that names. It was just an example. –  Enrichman Aug 24 '12 at 7:27
1  
@Enrichman: I wasn't suggesting those were the real names, but you're using the text of the class name in the map, when you can use a class literal instead. That's my point. –  Jon Skeet Aug 24 '12 at 7:28
    
Ah ok, got it. You're right. :) Btw I'm using Guice in my project so the provider stuff will be useful. IoC is the only way I think. –  Enrichman Aug 24 '12 at 7:29
public class Fruit {
    public Class<? extends Milkshake> getMilkshakeClass() {
        return Milkshake.class;
    }
}

public class Banana extends Fruit {
    public Class<? extends Milkshake> getMilkshakeClass() {
        return Banana.class;
    }
}

public class Pear extends Fruit {
    public Class<? extends Milkshake> getMilkshakeClass() {
        return PearMilkshake.class;
    }
}

You might even want to make an AbstractFruit class which has the methods used above as an abstract method which they must override

public abstract class AbstractFruit {
    public abstract Class<? extends Milkshake> getMilkshakeClass();
}

And rather than having them extend Fruit, extend that.

share|improve this answer
    
Now you are tying up the Fruit, Banana and Pear to have knowledge about Milkshake. Why would they have any knowledge about milkshakes? –  maba Aug 24 '12 at 7:31
    
Because you can take a fruit and make a milkshake about it? It's a completely plausible idea. He hasn't stated what exact knowledge of each other they have, but they're all public, so I assume they all know each other –  Alex Coleman Aug 24 '12 at 7:33
    
And you can make a cocktail or jam or whatever... –  maba Aug 24 '12 at 7:33
    
If he is planning on having tons of different options like that, how would he know what thing to make? For each fruit given, there must be only one option for the item to produce. Otherwise the hungry method wouldnt know what to use. So if each fruit has one corresponding item to make, this works fine –  Alex Coleman Aug 24 '12 at 7:35

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