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I am creating a structure like this in Mongoose:

var Access = new Schema({
  userId         : { type: ObjectId, unique: true },
  key            : { type: String, index: true },
  isOwner        : { type: Boolean, index: true },
});
mongoose.model('Access', Access);
var Workspace = new Schema({
  name           : { type: String, lowercase: true, unique: true},
  activeFlag     : Boolean,
  settings       : {
    welcomeMessage  : String,
    invoiceTemplate : String,
    longName        : String,
    defaultCountry  : String,
    countryId       : { type: ObjectId, index: true },
  },
  access          : [ Access ],

});
mongoose.model('Workspace', Workspace);

After adding some documents, I see the result:

{ "activeFlag" : true, 
  "name" : "w7",
  "_id" : ObjectId("5036131f22aa014c32000006"),
  "access" : [  
   {  "user": "merc",
      "key" : "673642387462834", 
      "isOwner" : true,
      "_id" : ObjectId("5036131f22aa014c32000007") 
   }
   ],
   "__v" : 0
}

I am confused by that _id in the sub-document, which doesn't seem to happen if I add just it as a sub-structure rather than a sub-schema. So questions:

1) Where does that _id come from? Is Mongoose's driver doing it? If so, how can I reach the same behaviour using straight Mongodb? Just by adding an ObjectId field?

2) When would you use a sub-document, and when would you use just a data structure?

3) I haven't gotten started with the serious part of my web application yet. However, wouldn't that ID there be really, and I mean really useful in case you are allowing JsonRest access to a sub-record in a document for example?

Thank you as ever!

Merc.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

EDIT: Removed data duplication piece of answer based on comments below.

To answer your other question, how to replicate this in MongoDB itself, you could create that document as follows:

db.foo.insert(
    { "activeFlag" : true, 
      "name" : "w7",
      "access" : [  
      {  "userId" : ObjectId(),
         "key" : "673642387462834", 
         "isOwner" : true,
         "_id" : ObjectId() 
      }
      ],
    "__v" : 0
})

To explain, the _id in the root document is implied - it will be added by MongoDB if not specified. However, to get _id into the sub-document, you have to manually specify it by calling the ObjectId() function. My doc looked like this:

db.foo.find().pretty()
{
    "_id" : ObjectId("50375bd0cee59c8561829edb"),
    "activeFlag" : true,
    "name" : "w7",
    "access" : [
        {
            "userId" : ObjectId("50375bd0cee59c8561829ed9"),
            "key" : "673642387462834",
            "isOwner" : true,
            "_id" : ObjectId("50375bd0cee59c8561829eda")
        }
    ],
    "__v" : 0
}
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry my bad... that userId actually points to an id in a different table. So there is actually no duplication and the _id added by mongoose is handy! Maybe update the answer with this new info -- thanks! –  Merc Aug 24 '12 at 11:11
    
I actually did explain both where it comes from and how to generate it in straight MongoDB also - what other information were you looking for? The when to use a sub-document question has been asked many, many times (look for embed versus link and similar). –  Adam Comerford Aug 24 '12 at 11:27
    
Answer is fine but there is no duplication in my data, so maybe take out the bit about duplication which wouldn't be part of the core question. Thank you for answering! –  Merc Aug 24 '12 at 11:47
    
So basically if I use ObjectID anywhere I am guaranteed to get a unique string...? –  Merc Aug 24 '12 at 11:48
    
You can reasonably expect uniqueness, yes, but it is not guaranteed, and technically not a string - take a look here for how it is generated: mongodb.org/display/DOCS/… –  Adam Comerford Aug 24 '12 at 12:25

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