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If I have a matrix:

0   0   3   4  
4   3   2   0  
2   0   2   0  

I want to extract the non-zero elements into some batches, with respect to a rule: if an element is already taken, the other element in the same row/column is not allowed. So the extracted matrix will be:
1st batch:

0   0   3   0  
4   0   0   0  
0   0   0   0  

2nd batch:

0   0   0   4  
0   3   0   0  
0   0   2   0  

3rd batch:

0   0   0   0  
0   0   2   0  
2   0   0   0  

Any other combination of batches is also accepted, as long as all non-zero elements are covered, and the rule is conformed. How would you do that in MATLAB/Octave?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Gunther was already on the right track. You want to select an element, if

  1. the row cumsum of the non-zeros is 1 AND
  2. the column cumsum of the non-zeros is 1 AND
  3. the element itself is non-zero.

The following code solves the problem:

A = [0, 0, 3, 4;
     4, 3, 2, 0;
     2, 0, 2, 0];

batches = cell(0);
while any(A(:)~=0)
    selector = cumsum(A~=0, 1) .* cumsum(A~=0, 2) .* (A~=0) == 1;
    batches{end+1} = A .* selector;
    A(selector) = 0;
end

Note however that the returned solution is not optimal because its 2nd batch is

0   0   0   4  
0   3   0   0  
2   0   0   0 

which means that the remaining matrix elements are from the same column:

0   0   0   0
0   0   2   0  
0   0   2   0 

Unfortunately, you cannot draw them in the same batch. So you end up with four batches instead of just three.

Edit: Probably, it is a good idea, to select first those elements, which appear in rows/columns with a lot of non-zeros. For example, one could use these weights

weight = repmat(sum(A~=0, 1), size(A, 1), 1) ...
         .* repmat(sum(A~=0, 2), 1, size(A, 2)) .* (A~=0)

weight =
     0     0     6     2
     6     3     9     0
     4     0     6     0

The following algorithm

batches = cell(0);
while any(A(:)~=0)
    batch = zeros(size(A));
    weight = repmat(sum(A~=0, 1), size(A, 1), 1) ...
             .* repmat(sum(A~=0, 2), 1, size(A, 2)) .* (A~=0);
    while any(weight(:)~=0)
        [r,c] = find(weight == max(weight(:)), 1);
        batch(r,c) = A(r,c);
        A(r,c) = 0;
        weight(r,:) = 0;
        weight(:,c) = 0;
    end
    batches{end+1} = batch;
end

returns those batches.

batches{:}
ans =
     0     0     0     4
     0     0     2     0
     2     0     0     0

ans =
     0     0     3     0
     4     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0

ans =
     0     0     0     0
     0     3     0     0
     0     0     2     0

So it worked at least for this small test case.

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Well now that loop looks awfully familiar...:) –  Rody Oldenhuis Aug 24 '12 at 14:25
    
@Rody: Yeah. Credits to you for the algorithm structure and to me for the weighting ;-) –  Mehrwolf Aug 25 '12 at 6:37
    
By the way, I think that summing the repmats instead of multiplying them might work even better. –  Mehrwolf Aug 25 '12 at 6:38
    
Thanks for the solution, and thanks to everybody for the interesting discussion. It is more than I expected... :) –  Nicolas Moreau Aug 26 '12 at 5:54
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For just the rows, I'd do it as follows:

A = [ 0   0   3   4  ;
      4   3   2   0  ;
      2   0   2   0 ];
  1. Checking if numbers are nonzero:

    Anonzero=A~=0;
    >> Anonzero
         0     0     1     1
         1     1     1     0
         1     0     1     0
    
  2. Take cumsum along the rows of Anonzero:

    Aidx=cumsum(A,[],2);
    >> Aidx
         0     0     1     2
         1     2     3     3
         1     1     2     2
    
    numbatches=max(Aidx(:,end));
    
  3. Set indices of zero values back to zero, so they won't get selected

    A(~Anonzero)=0;
    
  4. Extract batches:

    batch=cell(numbatches,1);
    for ii=1:numbatches
        batch{ii}=A.*(Aidx==ii);
    end
    

resulting in:

>>batch{1}
    0     0     3     0
    4     0     0     0
    2     0     0     0

>>batch{2}
    0     0     0     4
    0     3     0     0
    0     0     2     0

>>batch{3}
    0     0     0     0
    0     0     2     0
    0     0     0     0

I assume there can be done something similar for a row and column rule, but I don't see it right away.. I'll think about it ;)

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An interesting problem no doubt...My guess is that @GuntherStruyf's method will eventually be the one you should select. However, here's a simplistic solution using loops:

A = [
    0   0   3   4
    4   3   2   0
    2   0   2   0  ];

C = {};
nz = A ~= 0;
while any(nz(:))

    tmpNz = nz;
    tmpA  = A;
    newNz = false(size(nz));    
    while true

        [i,j] = find(tmpNz, 1);
        if isempty(i) || isempty(j), break; end

        tmpNz(i,:) = false;
        tmpNz(:,j) = false;
        newNz(i,j) = true;

    end

    tmpA(~newNz) = false;
    C{end+1} = tmpA;
    nz(newNz) = false;

end

This should be quite fast once you get rid of the growing cell-array, e.g., by pre-allocating it with a large number of initial elements, and then removing unused elements afterwards.

Nevertheless, I'd wait until @GuntherStruyf figures his thing out!

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I don't have much spare time today/next weekend/next week, so feel free to extend my solution :p –  Gunther Struyf Aug 24 '12 at 11:16
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