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I am using Log4j as logging framework in a project I am working on. I have the following situation: Log4j is configured to write the logs into a log file. At some point, this log file is copied to another destination and deleted. Logging framework keeps working, but the logs are not written to the log file because it is deleted. Is there any way to tell Log4j to recreate the file and keep writing the logs into the log file.

Best regards, Rashid

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I study the source of log4j and find log4j can't create new log file, it just print the error message to system.err when the log file was deleted

    /** 
     This method determines if there is a sense in attempting to append. 

     <p>It checks whether there is a set output target and also if 
     there is a set layout. If these checks fail, then the boolean 
     value <code>false</code> is returned. */  

  protected   boolean checkEntryConditions() {  
    if(this.closed) {  
      LogLog.warn("Not allowed to write to a closed appender.");  
      return false;  
    }  

    if(this.qw == null) {  
      errorHandler.error("No output stream or file set for the appender named ["+  
            name+"].");  
      return false;  
    }  

    if(this.layout == null) {  
      errorHandler.error("No layout set for the appender named ["+ name+"].");  
      return false;  
    }  
    return true;  
  }  

I think there are two workaround

  1. create another cron thread to monitor the log file
  2. add judge in getLog or getInstance (singleton), check the log file does exist, if not then init log4j
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Thanks for providing this code snipet. The first workaround you suggested is not simple enough. I think I will try to implement the second workaround you suggested. The methods, you mentioned, getLog and getInstance, in which class are they located? –  rashid.rashidov Aug 24 '12 at 10:14

Make sure you can declare this line in your log4j file

    log4j.appender.rollingFile.File=D:/myapp/mylog.log

If you already declared it, you log file can delete or replace as you like. Then you rerun your program and new log file is created in this path.

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thanks for the suggestion, but it won't work for me. I do not want to restart the application. –  rashid.rashidov Aug 24 '12 at 10:12
    
You don't need to restart. You can configure RollingFileAppender to create new log files. That means log4j will rename and move them as soon as they are "full" and it will then create a new log file. –  Aaron Digulla Aug 24 '12 at 12:44
    
I do not understand how this will work for me. As you say, new files are created when the existing file is full. In my case, I need new files to be created when the existing file is deleted. –  rashid.rashidov Aug 24 '12 at 13:29

Try This Class

package wodong.test;
import java.io.File;
import java.io.IOException;

import org.apache.log4j.FileAppender;
import org.apache.log4j.spi.LoggingEvent;

public class LastFileAppender extends FileAppender {
    @Override
    public void append(LoggingEvent event) {
        checkLogFileExist();
        super.append(event);
    }
    private void checkLogFileExist(){
        File logFile = new File(super.fileName);
        if (!logFile.exists()) {
            try {
                logFile.createNewFile();
            } catch (IOException e) {
                System.out.println("Error while create new log file.");
            }
        }
    }
}

Also edit the log4j config file

log4j.appender.R=wodong.test.LastFileAppender
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1  
I tried it already. It works, but there is significant performance degradation. Logging with such appender is roughly 10 times slower. –  rashid.rashidov Aug 24 '12 at 13:26

Try This one. I do not have a Linux machine right now, so I'm not sure if it can resolve the performance issue.

package wodong.test;
import java.io.File;
import java.io.IOException;

import org.apache.log4j.FileAppender;
import org.apache.log4j.spi.LoggingEvent;

public class LastFileAppender extends FileAppender {
    @Override
    public void append(LoggingEvent event) {

        checkLogFileExist();
        super.append(event);
    }

    private void checkLogFileExist() {
        if (qw == null) {
            File logFile = new File(super.fileName);
            if (!logFile.exists()) {
                try {
                    logFile.createNewFile();
                } catch (IOException e) {
                    System.out.println("Error while create new log file.");
                }
            }
        }
    }
}
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Hello. Thanks. Actually the performance degradation is not so significant. I checked Apache Tomcat. The similar code is used in access log implementation there. –  rashid.rashidov Aug 27 '12 at 8:11

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