Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a table called Scores which contains columns: id, player_id, value1, value2, value3 and date.

The table has next following content:

+------+-----------+--------+--------+--------+------------+
|  id  | player_id | value1 | value2 | value3 |    date    |
+------+-----------+--------+--------+--------+------------+
|   1  |     1     |   10   |    0   |   0    | 2012-08-02 |
+------+-----------+--------+--------+--------+------------+
|   2  |     2     |   15   |    1   |   0    | 2012-08-03 |
+------+-----------+--------+--------+--------+------------+
|   3  |     3     |    9   |    0   |   0    | 2012-08-04 |
+------+-----------+--------+--------+--------+------------+
|   4  |     1     |   11   |    0   |   0    | 2012-08-05 |
+------+-----------+--------+--------+--------+------------+
|   5  |     2     |   16   |    2   |   0    | 2012-08-06 |
+------+-----------+--------+--------+--------+------------+
|   6  |     2     |   15   |    0   |   0    | 2012-08-07 |
+------+-----------+--------+--------+--------+------------+

I am trying to get a query which returns the best highscore of each player ordered by the value in "value1, value2, value3". Value1 is the field with more importance, value2 medium importance and value3 minor importance, example:

value1 = 15                              value1 = 15
value2 = 1       is greater than ->      value2 = 0
value3 = 0                               value3 = 1

The expected result from the query which I need is:

+------+-----------+--------+--------+--------+------------+
|  id  | player_id | value1 | value2 | value3 |    date    |
+------+-----------+--------+--------+--------+------------+
|   5  |     2     |   16   |    2   |   0    | 2012-08-06 |
+------+-----------+--------+--------+--------+------------+
|   4  |     1     |   11   |    0   |   0    | 2012-08-05 |
+------+-----------+--------+--------+--------+------------+
|   3  |     3     |    9   |    0   |   0    | 2012-08-04 |
+------+-----------+--------+--------+--------+------------+

I'm trying with MAX, DISTINCT, GROUP BY and sub-queries but I don't get the correct result. Basically it is the next query but picking the first row of each "group":

SELECT id, player_id, value1, value2, value3
   FROM scores
   ORDER BY value1 DESC, value2 DESC, value3 DESC

------EDIT 1-------

eggyal's answer works fine but, maybe, the performance is not too good. I need to benchmark his solution against large database to check response times.

I have had an idea (and possible solution). The solution consists adding new boolean column which says if that score is the best score of that player or not. This way I need to check if the new score is better than the best old score of that player when I'm adding new score into DB, if it is I need to mark the flag as false in the old best score and as true in the new score. This gives me a way to retrieve the best score of each player directly (simple query like SELECT ... FROM .... ORDER BY).

------EDIT 2-------

weicap's answer is the fastest solution. I don't know why but his query is twice more faster than eggyal's query.

------EDIT 3------- I was wrong, weicap's query is more faster if the query was cached previously, if it wasn't the query takes ten or more seconds. In change, weicap's answer always takes 300-400ms against 80.000 rows.

share|improve this question
    
The problem with maintaining such a boolean column lies in the cost of determining which record holds the new "best score" on every update. A suitable index, on the other hand, is an ordered data structure that will (at any given time) be able to fetch the maximum record for each player with very little computational effort. Hence why I am advocating the composite index (player_id,value1,value2,value3) with my groupwise maximum solution -- it should prove to be extremely performant. Grateful for any benchmark feedback you wish to provide to the contrary, however! –  eggyal Aug 24 '12 at 10:37
    
First quick benchmark against 40.000 rows with composite index and query without LIMIT. eqqyal's answer took about 600ms and weicap's answer took 380ms . I know, I need to benchmark against larger database but this first times are promising... –  Morpheo Aug 24 '12 at 10:57
    
I'm surprised by those results... could you post the EXPLAIN output for my query? –  eggyal Aug 24 '12 at 11:14
    
@eggyal, you are right, your query is much more faster. Your solution is the best solution –  Morpheo Aug 26 '12 at 13:58

7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

you can try this

SELECT player_id,
  (SELECT value1
   FROM Scores b where a.player_id=b.player_id  ORDER BY value1 DESC, value2 DESC, value3 DESC limit 1) as value1,
  (SELECT value2
   FROM Scores b where a.player_id=b.player_id  ORDER BY value1 DESC, value2 DESC, value3 DESC limit 1) as value2,
  (SELECT value3
   FROM Scores b where a.player_id=b.player_id  ORDER BY value1 DESC, value2 DESC, value3 DESC limit 1) as value3

FROM Scores a GROUP BY player_id order by value1 DESC, value2 DESC, value3 DESC

or something like

SELECT * FROM Scores a 

where id =(SELECT id
   FROM Scores b where a.player_id=b.player_id  ORDER BY value1 DESC, value2 DESC, value3 DESC limit 1)

GROUP BY player_id order by value1 DESC, value2 DESC, value3 DESC
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Interesting solution. –  eggyal Aug 24 '12 at 10:27
    
I think this last has better performance –  weicap Aug 24 '12 at 10:48
1  
First query is twice more faster than second. I think first query is the best solution. –  Morpheo Aug 24 '12 at 11:02
    
As I said on my main post, weicap's solution is the fastest query. –  Morpheo Aug 26 '12 at 13:59

For each value, you can obtain the groupwise maximum:

SELECT * FROM Scores NATURAL JOIN (
  SELECT player_id, value1, value2, MAX(value3) value3 FROM Scores NATURAL JOIN (
  SELECT player_id, value1, MAX(value2) value2         FROM Scores NATURAL JOIN (
  SELECT player_id, MAX(value1) value1                 FROM Scores
    GROUP BY player_id) t
    GROUP BY player_id) t
    GROUP BY player_id) t
ORDER BY value1 DESC, value2 DESC, value3 DESC

See it on sqlfiddle.

share|improve this answer
    
It seems to be really slow, isn't it? Yes, this will work. But I wouldn't want this on large datasets. –  Nemoden Aug 24 '12 at 9:47
    
@Nemoden: Using the composite index (player_id,value1,value2,value3) it ought to be pretty performant. It's worth benchmarking against any other solution. –  eggyal Aug 24 '12 at 9:56
    
Yes, it seems to be better performance-wise now and seem to work as OP expected +1. Your first solution actually works, it's just my "thing" - to care about performance :) –  Nemoden Aug 24 '12 at 9:59
    
@Nemoden: And absolutely right to do so, too! :) –  eggyal Aug 24 '12 at 10:00
    
This solution works perfectly! but I'm worried about performance, I need to test against a table with thousands of rows. –  Morpheo Aug 24 '12 at 10:10

Try adding an index on (player_id, value1, value2, value3) and then this query:

SELECT
    s.*
FROM 
        Scores AS s
    JOIN
        ( SELECT DISTINCT
              player_id
          FROM 
              Scores
        ) AS p
      ON s.id =
         ( SELECT
               id
           FROM 
               Scores AS b
           WHERE
               b.player_id = p.player_id
           ORDER BY
               value1 DESC, value2 DESC, value3 DESC
           LIMIT 1
         ) 
ORDER BY
    s.value1 DESC, s.value2 DESC, s.value3 DESC ; 
share|improve this answer
    
As always ypercube, you outclass me! +1 :) –  eggyal Aug 26 '12 at 15:42
    
@eggyal: I have to say that I like the triple grouping in your query. –  ypercube Aug 26 '12 at 15:44

Your actual scores are: 1000, 1510, 900, etc... You got the idea? It's like decimal numbers where position of a single digit matter. You can convert your 3 values to a single one to group by it and you can estimate it either on-the-fly (right in query) or you can pre-calculate it (before you write it to the table).

share|improve this answer
    
Need to know in advance the maximum length/size of each value. –  eggyal Aug 24 '12 at 9:35
    
Well, yes, - you have to. Supposedly, OP knows it. –  Nemoden Aug 24 '12 at 9:36
    
Not necessarily... but one could design a query to obtain and use that information from the data in the table. –  eggyal Aug 24 '12 at 9:37
    
eggyal is right, I don't know in advance the maximum lenght of each value. –  Morpheo Aug 24 '12 at 9:37
    
That's can be a problem then. No way you can value scores from 0 to 100? It would be a slight redesign, but... by chance, can it be a better one? –  Nemoden Aug 24 '12 at 9:43

What language are you using (other than SQL)? It would be easiest if the SQL could sort it, but I don't think that this is possible. If you are using PHP, then you could just place it in a for loop, add an index to the array such as 'bestScore' and then check each score individually like so:

//Extract Data Here
for($outI=0;$outI<count($scores);$outI++){
    $scores[$outI]['bestScore'] = 0;
    for($innI=0;$innI<=3;$innI++){
        if ($scores[$outI]['value' . $innI+1] > $scores[$outI]['bestScore'])
            $scores[$outI]['bestScore'] = $scores[$outI]['value' . $innI+1];
    }
    echo 'The best score for ' . $scores[$outI]['player_id'] . ' was ' . $scores[$outI]['bestScore'] . '.<br />';
}

If it works as expected, it should list the best scores for each player.

share|improve this answer
    
guess what happens if he's got millions of players –  Nemoden Aug 24 '12 at 9:46
    
I prefer not to use another language because the table can contains thousands of rows and the memory to retrieve all rows to get the best score per player is inadmissible. –  Morpheo Aug 24 '12 at 9:46
    
That's a good point. But the SQL still has to run through it all. Is mysql faster than PHP –  Michael Thompson Aug 26 '12 at 15:44

Assuming your maximum sore can be 16 try this,

Select Scores.* from Scores, (SELECT player_id,max(17*17*value1+17*value2+value3) 
as max_score  FROM Scores group by player_id)t where 
(17*17*value1+17*value2+value3) = t.max_score and Scores.player_id=t.player_id
share|improve this answer
2  
And if the maximum score is not known, as already stated by the OP? –  eggyal Aug 24 '12 at 10:07
    
@eggyal then this won't work, anyways I just saw your solution, and that is much better. –  Ankur Aug 24 '12 at 10:11
SELECT * FROM (
SELECT id, player_id, value1, value2, value3, `date`
   FROM scores
   ORDER BY value1 DESC, value2 DESC, value3 DESC
) x 
GROUP BY player_id
order by value1 DESC, value2 DESC, value3 DESC
share|improve this answer
1  
-1 As explained in the manual: "The server is free to choose any value from each group, so unless they are the same, the values chosen are indeterminate.". Therefore one cannot rely on the ORDER BY clause employed in your subquery to ensure that the maximum record is selected from each group, as desired. –  eggyal Aug 24 '12 at 10:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.