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Trying to answer to this ticket : What is the difference between instanceof and Class.isAssignableFrom(...)?

I made a performance test :

class A{}
class B extends A{}

A b = new B();

void execute(){
  boolean test = A.class.isAssignableFrom(b.getClass());
  // boolean test = A.class.isInstance(b);
  // boolean test = b instanceof A;
}

@Test
public void testPerf() {
  // Warmup the code
  for (int i = 0; i < 100; ++i)
    execute();

  // Time it
  int count = 100000;
  final long start = System.nanoTime();
  for(int i=0; i<count; i++){
     execute();
  }
  final long elapsed = System.nanoTime() - start;
System.out.println(count+" iterations took " + TimeUnit.NANOSECONDS.toMillis(elapsed) + "ms.);
}

Which gave me :

  • A.class.isAssignableFrom(b.getClass()) : 100000 iterations took 15ms
  • A.class.isInstance(b) : 100000 iterations took 12ms
  • b instanceof A : 100000 iterations took 6ms

But playing with the number of iterations, I can see the performance is constant. For Integer.MAX_VALUE :

  • A.class.isAssignableFrom(b.getClass()) : 2147483647 iterations took 15ms
  • A.class.isInstance(b) : 2147483647 iterations took 12ms
  • b instanceof A : 2147483647 iterations took 6ms

Thinking it was a compiler optimization (I ran this test with JUnit), I changed it into this :

@Test
public void testPerf() {
    boolean test = false;

    // Warmup the code
    for (int i = 0; i < 100; ++i)
        test |= b instanceof A;

    // Time it
    int count = Integer.MAX_VALUE;
    final long start = System.nanoTime();
    for(int i=0; i<count; i++){
        test |= b instanceof A;
    }
    final long elapsed = System.nanoTime() - start;
    System.out.println(count+" iterations took " + TimeUnit.NANOSECONDS.toMillis(elapsed) + "ms. AVG= " + TimeUnit.NANOSECONDS.toMillis(elapsed/count));

    System.out.println(test);
}

But the performance is still "independent" of the number of iterations. Could someone explain that behavior ?

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Are you sure it takes 15ms for 100,000 iterations? It seems like a lot... –  assylias Aug 24 '12 at 9:45
    
@assylias I guess he only measured the "time to launch" before the JIT replaces the interpreted code. –  Marko Topolnik Aug 24 '12 at 9:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The JIT compiler can eliminate loops which don't anything. This can be triggered after 10,000 iterations.

What I suspect you are timing is how long it takes for the JIT to detect that the loop doesn't do anything and remove it. This will be a little longer than it takes to do 10,000 iterations.

share|improve this answer
    
I think the JIT will prove by statical analysis that the loop can be collapsed into a single check and compile without a loop. If the compile threshold is 1, it will realize that right away. –  Marko Topolnik Aug 24 '12 at 10:00
  1. A hundred iterations is not nearly enough for warmup. The default compile threshold is 10000 iterations (a hundred times more), so best go at least a bit over that threshold.
  2. Once the compilation has been triggered, the world is not stopped; the compilation takes place in the background. That means that its effect will start being observable only after a slight delay.
  3. There is ample space for optimization of your test in such a way that the entire loop is collapsed into its final result. That would explain the constant numbers.

Anyway, I always do the benchmarks by having an outer method call the inner method something like 10 times. The inner method does a big number of iterations, say 10,000 or more, as needed to make its runtime rise into at least tens of milliseconds. I don't even bother with nanoTime since if microsecond precision is important to you, it is just a sign of measuring too short a time interval.

When you do it like this, you are making it easy for the JIT to execute a compiled version of the inner method after it was substituted for the interpreted version. Another benefit is that you get assurance that the times of the inner method are stabilizing.

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If you want to make a real benchmark of a simple function, you should use a micro-benchmarking tool, like Caliper. It will be much simpler that trying to make your own benchmark.

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