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This is a quick question with the use of dict.keys()

I'm returning a dictionary in py file Ex:

response['dict'] = {'a': [1,2,4], 'b': [5,6,7]}

And in the html i'm try to loop over using keys

{% if dict %}
  {% for list in dict.keys() %}
    list
  {% endfor %}
{endif}

This is throwing an error.

TemplateSyntaxError: Could not parse the remainder: 'keys()' from 'dict.keys()

Need help here. How to use this in Django?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted
{% if dict %}
  {% for key, value in dict.items %}
    list
  {% endfor %}
{endif}

edit:

{% if dict %} is not needed - if given context's variable is empty (or if it's empty dict), it silently passes:

  {% for key, value in dict.items %}
    list
  {% endfor %}
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2  
Yes, the main point here - as clearly explained in the documentation - is that you don't use the calling () in Django templates. –  Daniel Roseman Aug 24 '12 at 10:00
    
This is working. Thanks –  Ravi Teja Aug 24 '12 at 10:06
    
And on a related note. how to use join in django {% for key, value in dict.items %} ('\n').join(list) ???? {% endfor %} –  Ravi Teja Aug 24 '12 at 10:11
    

It is probably because dict is a reserved keyword in Python. Try

{% if d %}
  {% for key in d.keys() %}
    list
  {% endfor %}
{endif}

or simply

{% if d %}
  {% for key in d %}
    list
  {% endfor %}
{endif}

an iterator over a dictionary in python is by default over the keys so you don't have to specify that you want the keys and not .items() or .values().

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1  
using d.keys() is incorrect - brackets cannot be used in template, correct notation is d.keys –  yedpodtrzitko Aug 24 '12 at 10:01
    
dict isn't a reserved keyword it's the name of a builtin type. Python doesn't actually stop you reassigning the name dict if you really want to, though admittedly it's not a good idea as you the lose access to the builtin. –  redrah Aug 24 '12 at 10:03
    
dict was a good catch, but i just used it over here for example. Sorry for the confusion. yedpodtrzitko's answer solved the issue. Thanks –  Ravi Teja Aug 24 '12 at 10:07
    
@redrah I don't see how that makes it any less reserved. The fact that Python doesn't stop you from overwriting it makes it no less reserved as the name that points to the built in dictionary. –  Matti Lyra Aug 24 '12 at 10:10
    
@MattiLyra I get where you're coming from but my point is that there is an important distinction between a keyword and a name. For example class, if etc. are keywords in Python, and therefore it's impossible to give a variable the name class as it is reserved for syntax, if you try you'll get a SyntaxError. A name has no syntactic importance beyond being a name, and so any name can be assigned to any object, even dict. –  redrah Aug 24 '12 at 10:34

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