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I have following code.

1st Class

package com.test;

public class CustomizeHere
{    
private CustomizeMe customizeMe = new CustomizeMe();    
public void setDescription()
{
    customizeMe.setText("How about calling some method before me?");
}    
}

2nd Class

package com.test;

public final class CustomizeMe
{
private String text = null;    
public String getText()
{
    return text;
}

public void setText(String text)
{
    this.text = text;
}    
}

3rd class

package com.test;

public class ReflectCustomizer
{    
/**
 * @param args
 */
public static void main(String[] args)
{
    CustomizeHere customizeHere = new CustomizeHere();
    // Requirement here is when customizeMe.setText() before method invocation we want to add some additional behaviour at run time like we should come to
    // know setText() is invoked.
    customizeHere.setDescription();        
}    
}

I wanted to know in above scenario can I anyway come to know that setText() method on CustomizeMe is being invoked? And I can't change code from customizeMe, but I have Instance of customizeMe at the runtime using reflection.

I can not change code in CustomizeMe and CustomizeHere classes. Also as java.lang.Reflect.Method class does not allow to attach any listner so that I would come to know that it is being invoked so Is there another way?

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what exactly you want..? you are calling customizeHere.setDescription(); which is call customizeMe.setText("How about calling some method before me?"); so en the end setText() called .. | –  Sumit Singh Aug 24 '12 at 10:24

2 Answers 2

If your requirement is to set some parameters on the object before invoking some other methods, you can either have constructors that take these parameters, or to follow the Builder pattern if you have interdependencies between the various configuration options you want to create.

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An advanced way is by defining an Aspect targeting the setText method which contains the additional logic you want to write. This would run for all invocations of that method on any instance of that the class this aspect targets.

Aspects are meant to address cross-cutting concerns, though.

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