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When I type in the following code and run it, it types <FONT COLOR='foo'></FONT>. However, when I add my to the loop variable (for my $name (@colors)), it types the expected <FONT COLOR='red'></FONT>. Can anyone explain why?

@colors = qw(red blue green yellow orange purple violet);
$name = 'foo';
for $name (@colors) {
  no strict 'refs';
  *$name = sub { "<FONT COLOR='$name'></FONT>" };
}
print red();
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You are "lexicalizing" the loop variable here, not "localizing" it. local has a specific meaning in Perl that actually precludes using a variable in a lexical scope. –  mob Aug 24 '12 at 16:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In your loop you create several subs. These subs can see all the variables of the context that they are created in.

If we use local / global variables, the sub will always see the latest value (The interpolation of the variable into the string does'nt happen at compile-time or "definition-time", but when the sub is executed.) In our case, the current value outside the loop is foo.

If we use lexical variables with my, the variable that we used inside the loop is invisible outside of the loop and invisible in all other iterations of the loop. However, it is still visible to the sub itself. This is called a closure. Closures only work with lexical variables and are a powerful method to achieve information hiding or to construct specifically tailored subs like in the example code.

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So you mean to say that when I am not using my, initially the subs are formed correctly at compile time, but at run-time, the interpolation of the $name variable renders all the subs into printing foo? Why would a normal for loop be executed during compile-time and not during run-time only? And does the fact that using my does the trick has got anything to do with the fact that within a scope, lexicals always take precedence over globals? –  Cupidvogel Aug 24 '12 at 11:30
    
When you create a sub, the code inside is not interpolated. That only happens in your print statement. But every sub can see the environment it was created in. The fact that my does the trick is because these variables are no longer accessible once they go out of scope — except when there is some sort of more persistent reference to them like a reference or a closure. Explaining closures is a pain, I only understood them by using them excessively myself. –  amon Aug 24 '12 at 11:39
    
Oh, so you are saying that when I am using the print, only then is $name being evaluated. So if it's a global, it's global value (which is currently foo) is used, whereas if it's a lexical, the value that it had during the running of the loop is used. –  Cupidvogel Aug 24 '12 at 11:43

The variable used in a for loop has some magic attached to it. For each iteration of the loop, it is set to the appropriate value. After the end of the loop, $name is set to it's old value. Basically, every sub you create sees the same variable which changes it's value. I've modified your example to demonstrate this:

@colors = qw(red blue green yellow orange purple violet);
$name = 'foo';
for $name (@colors) {
  no strict 'refs';
  *$name = sub { "<FONT COLOR='$name'></FONT>" };
  print $name . &{$name} . "\n";
}
print red() . "\n";

You can create a local variable by defining it with the function my like this:

for my $name (@colors) {

As a rule of thumb, you should always use strict; in your programs, which enforces initialization of variables.

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Closures capture variables, not values.

Think of for my $x as creating a new variable every time through the loop. The inner sub captures this variable instead of the similarly named package variable whose value never changes from foo.

When you remove the my, only one variable is created (a package variable), so each sub created in the loop refes to the same variable (whose value goes from foo to red to blue to ... to violet to foo).

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(my is optimised to not always create a new variable, but the intended effect of my is to create a new variable, and this is what happens here.) –  ikegami Aug 24 '12 at 11:55

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