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I want to handle Timeblocks, that means a set of two DateTimes which represent for example the presence of employees. Is there already any structure that i can use to search for a block before or after a specific time? There are many ways i can imagine to express the situation, like i said with two DateTimes for start and end or with a Datetime for start and a TimeSpan. But i want them to be handled in a kind of Collection. So is there anything similar that i can use or do i have to implement it completely on my own?

Thanks

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1  
Here's a start for you: struct TimeBlock { private readonly DateTime start; private readonly TimeSpan duration; public TimeBlock(DateTime start, TimeSpan duration) { this.start = start; this.duration= duration; } public DateTime Start { get { return start; } } public TimeSpan Duration { get { return duration; } } } –  Lucero Aug 24 '12 at 12:15
    
@lucero: post it as an anwser. You followed the golden rule of struct immutability. I think you can point this in your answer (and maybe suggesting to overrides gethashcode, equals, etc.) –  Steve B Aug 24 '12 at 12:24

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

this library is a great thing - may you get inspired

Time Period Library for .NET

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Nearly what i looked for, i will try to use this in collections, but it looks very useful in my case. Maybe with some extensions they fit in a SortedDictionary or sth like that... –  SaschaW Aug 24 '12 at 12:35

Thanks for the help! I will tae a closer look at the TimePeriod Library and do some experiments with Linq. I already have an approch that implements binary search, so if someones interested you can write me ;)

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The class:

public class TimePeriod
{
    public DateTime Oldest { get; set; }
    public DateTime Newest { get; set; }

    public TimePeriod(DateTime oldest, DateTime newest)
    {
        Oldest = oldest;
        Newest = newest;
    }

    public bool Contains (DateTime time)
    {
        return Oldest.CompareTo(time) <= 0 && Newest.CompareTo(time) >= 0;
    }

    public bool IsAfter(DateTime time)
    {
        return Newest.CompareTo(time) <= 0;
    }

    public bool IsBefore(DateTime time)
    {
        return Oldest.CompareTo(time) >= 0; 
    }
}

The Test:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var period = new TimePeriod(
                    DateTime.Now.AddDays(-2),
                    DateTime.Now.AddDays(1));

        var date = DateTime.Now;
        var contains = period.Contains(date); // true
        var isBefore = period.IsBefore(date); // false
        var isAfter = period.IsAfter(date);   // false

        date = DateTime.Now.AddDays(-10);
        contains = period.Contains(date); // false
        isBefore = period.IsBefore(date); // true
        isAfter = period.IsAfter(date);   // false

        date = DateTime.Now.AddDays(10);
        contains = period.Contains(date); // false
        isBefore = period.IsBefore(date); // false
        isAfter = period.IsAfter(date);   // true
    }
}

Now you can use collections and linq with extensions methods and lambda expression to look for time blocks.

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Simple approach, but i never thought about using linq, thanks for that hint –  SaschaW Aug 24 '12 at 12:44
    
I agree with Lucero's comment (on the question). I think a struct would be more intuitive to use (TimeSpan, DateTime are structs too). –  Steve B Aug 24 '12 at 13:02

I've used a DateSpan structure before. You can extend is a much as one likes, but this will give you a starting point.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;

namespace StackOverFlowDateSpan
{
[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Auto)]
[Serializable]
public struct DateSpan : IComparable, IComparable<DateSpan>, IEquatable<DateSpan>
{
    public DateSpan(DateTime start, DateTime end)
        : this()
    {
        Start = start;
        End = end;
    }

    #region Properties

    public TimeSpan Duration
    {
        get { return TimeSpan.FromTicks((End - Start).Ticks); }
    }

    public DateTime End { get; private set; }
    public DateTime Start { get; private set; }

    #endregion

    public int CompareTo(DateSpan other)
    {
        long otherTicks = other.Duration.Ticks;
        long internalTicks = Duration.Ticks;

        return internalTicks > otherTicks ? 1 : (internalTicks < otherTicks ? -1 : 0);
    }

    public bool Equals(DateSpan other)
    {
        return End.Equals(other.End) && Start.Equals(other.Start);
    }

    public int CompareTo(object other)
    {
        if (other == null)
        {
            return 1;
        }

        if (!(other is DateSpan))
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("other");
        }

        return CompareTo((DateSpan)other);
    }

    public override bool Equals(object other)
    {
        if (ReferenceEquals(null, other))
        {
            return false;
        }
        return other is DateSpan && Equals((DateSpan)other);
    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        unchecked
        {
            return (End.GetHashCode() * 397) ^ Start.GetHashCode();
        }
    }

    public static bool operator ==(DateSpan left, DateSpan right)
    {
        return left.Equals(right);
    }

    public static bool operator !=(DateSpan left, DateSpan right)
    {
        return !left.Equals(right);
    }

    private sealed class EndStartEqualityComparer : IEqualityComparer<DateSpan>
    {
        #region IEqualityComparer<DateSpan> Members

        public bool Equals(DateSpan x, DateSpan y)
        {
            return x.End.Equals(y.End) && x.Start.Equals(y.Start);
        }

        public int GetHashCode(DateSpan obj)
        {
            unchecked
            {
                return (obj.End.GetHashCode() * 397) ^ obj.Start.GetHashCode();
            }
        }

        #endregion
    }

    private static readonly IEqualityComparer<DateSpan> _endStartComparerInstance = new EndStartEqualityComparer();

    public static IEqualityComparer<DateSpan> EndStartComparer
    {
        get { return _endStartComparerInstance; }
    }
}
}
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Hi, looks good, i would change the CompareTo method into public int CompareTo(DateSpan other) { return Duration.CompareTo(other.Duration); } –  SaschaW Aug 24 '12 at 12:42
    
That's a good point. Next time I'm working on my utilities library I'll modify that. –  Jensen Aug 24 '12 at 12:50

You may take a look at TimeSpan. Thats a struct to handle a "Timeblock"

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But without a start or end. Just a duration. –  usr Aug 24 '12 at 12:41
    
A TimeSpan can only handle a duration, but i want to manage blocks with a specific start and end. –  SaschaW Aug 24 '12 at 12:45

This is not built-in. If you want to implement this yourself you probably want to create a struct. This will give you value-type copy semantics. Such a value behaves just like built-in types like int or DateTime. Very intuitive to use.

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I have ideas about a possible selfmade implementation, but i dont want to do it myself when theres already functionality for handling intersection and stuff like that, but thanks anyway –  SaschaW Aug 24 '12 at 12:37

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