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I have a Table Structure as below

CREATE TABLE `eatables` (
    `Sno` int(11) NOT NULL auto_increment,
    `Name` varchar(255) collate latin1_general_ci default NULL,
    PRIMARY KEY  (`Sno`)
);

The Table contains Rows as below

insert into `eatables`(`Sno`,`Name`) values (1,'Apples');
insert into `eatables`(`Sno`,`Name`) values (2,'Oranges');
insert into `eatables`(`Sno`,`Name`) values (3,'Papaya');
insert into `eatables`(`Sno`,`Name`) values (4,'Jackfruit');
insert into `eatables`(`Sno`,`Name`) values (5,'Pineapple');
insert into `eatables`(`Sno`,`Name`) values (6,'Mango');

I created a Procedure to get the Count based on Name as Constraint

DROP PROCEDURE IF EXISTS proc_fruit_count;
CREATE PROCEDURE mp_user_preference(pFruitName VARCHAR(255))
BEGIN 
     SELECT @lngCount = COUNT(Sno) 
       FROM eatables
      WHERE Name = pFruitName;

     SELECT @lngCount; 
END

But my Procedure is returning Null every time I execute it.

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2 Answers 2

You have to modify your stored procedure! You also need to use IN keyword:

CREATE PROCEDURE mp_user_preference(IN pFruitName VARCHAR(255))
BEGIN 
     SELECT @lngCount = COUNT(Sno) 
       FROM eatables
      WHERE Name = pFruitName;

     SELECT @lngCount; 
END

See http://www.mysqltutorial.org/stored-procedures-parameters.aspx

Edit:If you want to return lngCount you can modify the stored procedure as follow:

CREATE PROCEDURE mp_user_preference(IN pFruitName VARCHAR(255), OUT toReturn INT)
BEGIN 
       SELECT @lngCount = COUNT(Sno) 
       FROM eatables
      WHERE Name = pFruitName
      INTO toReturn;

END
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You don't need a stored procedure here. You can solve this conveniently with a prepared statement.

prepare stmt from 'select count(*) from eatables where name = ?';
set @whatever = 'Mango';
execute stmt using @whatever; /* @whatever replaces the ? in the query above */
/* and if you don't need the prepared statement any more you do... */
deallocate prepare stmt;

Read more about prepared statements here.

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