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I have a BindingSource whose DataSource (defined as an object) could be any type of IEnumerable class at runtime (such as IList<Foo>). I need to convert it to an IQueryable<T> so that I can pass it in to a generic extension:

IOrderedQueryable<TEntity> OrderUsingSortExpression<TEntity>(this IQueryable<TEntity> source, string sortExpression) where TEntity : class

So far I have this:

string order = "Message ASC";
Type thetype = bsTotalBindingSource.DataSource.GetType().GetGenericArguments()[0];
IEnumerable<object> totalDataSource = ((IEnumerable<object>)(bsTotalBindingSource.DataSource));
//Blowing up on this next line with 'System.Linq.Queryable is not a GenericTypeDefinition. MakeGenericType may only be called on a type for which Type.IsGenericTypeDefinition is true.'
MethodInfo asQueryableMethod = typeof(Queryable).MakeGenericType(thetype).GetMethod("AsQueryable", BindingFlags.Static | BindingFlags.Public, null, new[] { typeof(IQueryable<>) }, null); 
MethodInfo genericAsQueryableMethod = asQueryableMethod.MakeGenericMethod(thetype);
MethodInfo orderUsingSortExpressionMethod = GetType().GetMethod("OrderUsingSortExpression");
MethodInfo genericUsingSortExpressionMethod = orderUsingSortExpressionMethod.MakeGenericMethod(thetype);
bsTotalBindingSource.DataSource = genericUsingSortExpressionMethod.Invoke(this, new object[] { genericAsQueryableMethod.Invoke(totalDataSource, null), order });

As you can see, the end goal here is to be able to take something from a DataSource, get its RuntimeType of IEnumerable<T> where T can be whatever, then call AsQueryable<T> so it can be passed into a function which accepts an IQueryable<T>.

EDIT After digging around to find specifically the methods I am looking for I have gotten a bit farther on the problem. It now looks like this:

string order = "Message ASC";
Type thetype = bsTotalBindingSource.DataSource.GetType().GetGenericArguments()[0];
//Returns the AsQueryable<> method I am looking for
MethodInfo asQueryableMethod = typeof(Queryable).MakeGenericType(thetype).GetMethods()[1]; 
MethodInfo genericAsQueryableMethod = asQueryableMethod.MakeGenericMethod(thetype);
MethodInfo orderUsingSortExpressionMethod = typeof(SortExtension)GetType().GetMethods()[0];
MethodInfo genericUsingSortExpressionMethod = orderUsingSortExpressionMethod.MakeGenericMethod(thetype);
bsTotalBindingSource.DataSource = genericUsingSortExpressionMethod.Invoke(this, new object[] { genericAsQueryableMethod
//blows up here with 'Object of type 'System.RuntimeType' cannot be converted to type 'System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable`1[LogRecordDTO]'.'
.Invoke(bsTotalBindingSource.DataSource, new object[] {thetype}), order });
share|improve this question
    
The problem is that I do not know what TElement is, which is why I am trying to invoke AsQueryable through reflection –  odiernod Aug 24 '12 at 12:34
    
I think you want to lose the MakeGenericType, as Queryable is indeed not a generic type. –  Rawling Aug 24 '12 at 12:38
    
Could you post your methods and classes as they are so I can build a test app please. –  Mennan Kara Aug 24 '12 at 12:43
    
@odiernod: "so it can be passed into a function which accepts an IQueryable<T>" - how do you plan to call this function? through reflection too? –  Dennis Aug 24 '12 at 13:44
    
@Dennis: I had planned on it yes, since I do not know what T is –  odiernod Aug 24 '12 at 13:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I think the simplest way would be to overload (or add an extension method) to the method that you want to call, taking in an IEnumerable as an argument. Then simply call the other method from it. Here's an example of what I mean.

public class MyTestClass
{
    public void Run()
    {
        List<string> myList = new List<string>() { "one", "two" };

        object myListObject = (object)myList;

        Test(myListObject);
    }

    private void Test(object myListObject)
    {
        Type myGenericType = myListObject.GetType().GetGenericArguments().First();

        MethodInfo methodToCall = typeof(MyTestClass).GetMethods().Single(
            method => method.Name.Equals("GenericMethod") && method.GetParameters().First().Name.Equals("myEnumerableArgument"));

        MethodInfo genericMethod = methodToCall.MakeGenericMethod(myGenericType);

        genericMethod.Invoke(this, new object[] { myListObject });
    }

    public void GenericMethod<T>(IQueryable<T> myQueryableArgument)
    {
    }

    public void GenericMethod<T>(IEnumerable<T> myEnumerableArgument)
    {
        GenericMethod<T>(myEnumerableArgument.AsQueryable());
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I did exactly this and it works perfectly. Thank you much. –  odiernod Aug 27 '12 at 10:13

I think the following might work:

// Get generic type argument for everything
Type theType = bsTotalBindingSource.DataSource
    .GetType().GetGenericArguments()[0];

// Convert your IEnumerable<?>-in-an-object to IQueryable<?>-in-an-object
var asQueryable =
    // Get IEnumerable<?> type
    typeof(IEnumerable<>)
    .MakeGenericType(new[] { theType })
    // Get IEnumerable<?>.AsQueryable<?> method
    .GetMethod(
        "AsQueryable",
        new Type[] { theType },
        System.Reflection.BindingFlags.Static |
        System.Reflection.BindingFlags.Public)
    // Call on the input object
    .Invoke(bsTotalBindingSource.DataSource, new object[0]);

// Sort this queryable
var asSortedQueryable =
    // Get the YourType<?> generic class your sorting generic method is in?
    // If your class isn't generic I guess you can skip the MakeGenericType.
    typeof(yourtype)
    .MakeGenericType(new[] { theType })
    // Get the OrderUsingSortExpression<?> method
    .GetMethod(
        "OrderUsingSortExpression",
        new Type[] { theType },
        System.Reflection.BindingFlags.Static |
        System.Reflection.BindingFlags.Public)
    // Call on the IQueryable<?> object
    .Invoke(dataSource, new object[] { order });

// Set this object to the data source
bsTotalBindingSource.DataSource = asSortedQueryable;

As a disclaimer, I'm not massively clear on this. e.g. when getting AsQueryable<T> from IEnumerable<T>, do you need to pass in the generic argument? But I do believe what you want to do is possible, and does need reflection, and I do think this is roughly right.

share|improve this answer
    
upon using this 'var asQueryable = // Get IEnumerable<?> type typeof(IEnumerable<>) .MakeGenericType(new[] { theType }) // Get IEnumerable<?>.AsQueryable<?> method .GetMethod( "AsQueryable", new Type[] { theType }, System.Reflection.BindingFlags.Static | System.Reflection.BindingFlags.Public) // Call on the input object .Invoke(bsTotalBindingSource.DataSource, new object[]{thetype});' it give me the System.RuntimeType error I show in my question edit –  odiernod Aug 24 '12 at 14:04

Not sure if I understand the question - although I've read it a few times. You say you want to convert IEnumerable<T> to IQueryable<T> where T's type is unknown.

private void Test<T>(IEnumerable<T> x)
{
    var queryableX = x.AsQueryable();
}

NOTE: you need to be using System.Linq.

share|improve this answer
    
How would I call this if I don't know what T is? –  odiernod Aug 24 '12 at 13:25
    
That is the whole point of the generic parameter T - you don't need to know what it is to call this method. Or are you saying you don't know what the entire IEnumerable<T> is? i.e. you just have, say, an object - but that object could actually be, say, an IList<T>? If so remove your downvote and amend your question because that is not what you have said. –  PeteGO Aug 24 '12 at 13:36
    
BindingSource.DataSource is an object, so it theoretically could be anything. I have updated the question. For the record, I never downvoted you, someone else must have, but it seems they have removed it. –  odiernod Aug 24 '12 at 14:06
    
:) I have added another answer that I think does what you need. –  PeteGO Aug 24 '12 at 16:02

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