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I'm writing a recursive procedure, called "subliner3". To be simple it replaces:

  1. [object method] with Object->method()
  2. [object method:attr1 attr2 ...] with object->method(attr1,attr2,...)

It is recursive to replace (1) and (2) inside (2). Any attr may be like (1) or (2).

So, this code causes problem:

while {[regsub -all {\[([^\[\]:]+)[:]([^\[\]]+)\]} $subline "[subliner3 "\\1" "\\2"]" subline]} {}

This is supposed to find exactly (2) in subline (subline is an attribute list) and call function again for it. The problem is that, when subline is called with regsub's \1 and \2 subliner3 really gets "\1" and "\2", so looks like they are interpreted afted subliner3 call. How can I manage to call [subliner3 "\1" "\2"] with interpreted \1 & \2?

Sample Input:

[self runAction:[CCSequence actions:[CCDelayTime actionWithDuration:5], [CCCallFunc actionWithTarget:self selector:@selector(resetMessage)], nil]]; 

Output:

self->runAction(CCSequence::actions(CCDelayTime::actionWithDuration(5), CCCallFunc::actionWithTarget(self, @selector(resetMessage)), nil);
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Would you please post an example of input and expected output string please? –  Gabber Aug 24 '12 at 13:02
    
Input: [self runAction:[CCSequence actions:[CCDelayTime actionWithDuration:5], [CCCallFunc actionWithTarget:self selector:@selector(resetMessage)], nil]]; Output: self->runAction(CCSequence::actions(CCDelayTime::actionWithDuration(5), CCCallFunc::actionWithTarget(self, @selector(resetMessage)), nil); –  Deepscorn Aug 24 '12 at 15:29
    
Your input language is Objective-C and your output is, maybe, C++? –  Donal Fellows Aug 24 '12 at 21:38
    
Yes, it is. To be more simple there is a proc: proc getSp { sp } { puts $sp; regsub {nomatter} $sp sp; return $sp} Which is called something like: set s2 [regsub -all {nomatter2} "some text" "[getSp "\\1"]"] The problem is, that inside getSp I have exactly "\\1" and not the thing, second regsub returned. –  Deepscorn Aug 25 '12 at 8:41
    
{nomatter2} is like: {(som)} –  Deepscorn Aug 25 '12 at 8:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can do it (under some assumptions, such as no use of arrays) but you really need to work inside out and to put your substitution code in a loop.

# Your sample as input
set string {[self runAction:[CCSequence actions:[CCDelayTime actionWithDuration:5], [CCCallFunc actionWithTarget:self selector:@selector(resetMessage)], nil]];}

# Do most of the replacements, recursively.
#
# Note that some parts are changed to \001stripExtra stuff\002, because we need
# to do further processing on the arguments which can't quite be done in this
# looped [regsub].
while {[regsub -all {\[(\w+) (\w+):([^]]+)\]} $string \
        "\\1::\\2(\u0001stripExtra \\3\u0002)" string]} {}

# The further processing to do on arguments (removing selectors)
proc stripExtra args {
    foreach s $args {
        # The lack of a fourth argument means [regsub] returns the string
        lappend t [regsub {^\w+:(?!:)} [string trimright $s ","] {}]
    }
    return [join $t ","]
}
# Apply the further processing by converting to a substitutable string
set string [subst [string map {\u0001 "\[" \u0002 "\]"} $string]]

# Now transformed...
puts $string

The code above is rather brittle as it doesn't actually understand Objective-C, so you should check that its output is reasonable on your real input data…

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Thank you. \u0001 and \u0002 are used to put [ ] instead finally, as I see. I'm not very familuar with TCL, tell me please is there any possibility, that input string will have these symbols. Maybe, there will be some strings, like: [self getChild:"ChildNameWithThisSymbol"]? What are these symbols are used for? –  Deepscorn Aug 25 '12 at 18:48
    
@IgriZdes It's really exceptionally unlikely, as they're not valid characters in an Objective-C program (their escaped form might be, but the characters themselves are not). What's more, there are thousands of other character pairs that could be used instead (e.g., anyone using the C1 control characters is very strange or has a messed up file encoding). You're far more likely to have problems with references to array elements, as I mentioned, as they're much closer in syntax to what you're transforming from, and telling them apart reliably requires a full Objective-C parser. –  Donal Fellows Aug 25 '12 at 22:59

One of possible solutions is: expr \"[regsub -all {(1)} "number 1" "[getSp \1]"]\" So, at first, regsub manages to put (1) on \1 position. Then expr makes to call getSp. And it will be called not with \1, but with (1). But to work with this solution I need to make sure, that string, returned by regsub has [ ] specified only for procedures, but it is not allways like that. For example string after regsub call may be like that: [self runAction:[CCSequence actions:[subliner3 "CCDelayTime actionWithDuration" "5"], [subliner3 "CCCallFunc actionWithTarget" "self selector:@selector(resetMessage)"], nil]]; Where only subliner3 - is a procedure.

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