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I found around 8 Strenghts and flaws of using APEX over another program(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oracle_Application_Express), but i am not sure i quite understand WHEN to use it.

From what i understand, if you want a fast and easy-to-use development tool related to Oracle, Apex is your first choice. While if you need a complex solution, APEX won't fit.

I would like to know you guys opinion on this. In my case, i need to know if i should recommand this product or not for a raquetball club. Since it is not a big company, i believe HTML DB would be the best choice because we want as less manipulations as possible once it's implemented. We also don't want the owner of the club to pay a lot of money to get somoeone who can develop updates.

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2 Answers 2

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Apex is free, and an oracle XE database is free too. Apex is rapid development.

But what you're asking depends on so much more.

From what i understand, if you want a fast and easy-to-use development tool related to Oracle, Apex is your first choice.

Is an oracle database already being used? Easy to use dev tool: yes, sure. But as with anything, it depends on whether you have some experience with it, what the specs and expectations are, ...

While if you need a complex solution, APEX won't fit.

Well,... Would a complex solution be so much less complex in another environment? Just how complex are we thinking? In my opinion, you can go pretty far in apex and adapt it to your needs. it might involve creating templates and plugins to set up a framework, but it is doable. An example would be apex projects whom have been completely integrated with ExtJS. Apex is not the answer to everything too, but it's good. If you'd stay within the Oracle stack for more involved/complex, i'd say the next thing is ADF. Personally, i'm not convinced by that one though. It also has its pros and cons (such as: requiring java knowledge. pro for some, con for others...)

In my case, i need to know if i should recommand this product or not for a raquetball club. Since it is not a big company, i believe HTML DB would be the best choice because we want as less manipulations as possible once it's implemented.

How large is this club? How intense will the website be used? Is there a DB already? Is it Oracle? Who has DBA knowledge (even basic)? Who will develop? If your specs are up to spec, then much fiddling shouldn't be necessary after the launch.

We also don't want the owner of the club to pay a lot of money to get somoeone who can develop updates

Who will host the server? Who will run it? Who will administrate it? Do you plan to go cloud-based?

I'd almost ventured to suggest PHP may be a good alternative if this is a small project. Those developers may be easier to find and less expensive than an apex/oracle developer. But then again, if you're planning to outsource it may be less of an issue. If your oracle instance would be in the cloud somewhere, you'd even be pretty safe i'd believe...

Really, what options are you trying to compare? You're asking about apex, do you have any experience with it?

Honestly, your question is not so much a question as it is an opener to a discussion. Each technology and database will have its pro's and cons, fans and dislikers.

Personally, i really like apex. It has a lot going for it, especially when you're already invested in the Oracle stack. And it is still growing, getting good support, and great releases with lots of new features.
I can't really say how it must be set up a (reliable) service from the ground up: server and database, doesn't matter how small, you'll need some understanding and knowledge for that. If you just wing it and cross your fingers, you'll burn them somewhere down the line. Same with development. But as far as i'm concerned that goes for any other tech. Unless you outsource those aspects of course.
Etc etc. There is much and more to be discussed this way.

I put a downvote there for these reasons: there is much to be discussed, it isn't really much of a question which has a conclusive answer. And it maybe only could fetch a conclusive answer if you put more specifications up there and get people of the concurrent platforms to respond.


Edit
I'd like to react on Daniel's post.

First I have to say that I am originally a PHP-Developer, and I really like this language and environment. Nevertheless I decided to do an internship this summer, where I am currently working with APEX. Together with another intern I am developing a bigger application, and I hope to give you some useful input. This only covers the development of the application, as I am not really involved in things like database administration and so on (although I have to say that a PHP Webspace with a MySQL Database also isn't to hard to administrate, especially if there are not too many users).

I'm a developer too, and i don't do server and database administration (corporate environment). Not that i haven't dabbled a bit here and there in my spare time, but i digress.

But my experience is that it gets very, very hard to solve tasks which are out of this range. That doesn't mean that you can't get multiple tables in one reports, some joining of tables is also not a big problem, and can be easily achieved. But if your application needs even more than this I cannot recommend APEX, so I totally agree with your rule, that complex applications should be created in another way.

So speaking as a PHP developer, would you even recommend PHP to achieve this? Would it be less or just as complex?
I'd also argue about complexity. I've worked on some large forms, which for me by now means there are more than your average amount of items, some dynamic actions, validations, maybe some custom process(es). I've not encountered extremely complex situations and honestly i'd question who created those expectations. Thinking outside the box may be a virtue at times, but that doesn't mean the box is always bad. Complex mechanisms or pages can maybe be broken down into more easily accomplishable parts. An example would be using modal pages to break it up.

I also think that the slogan with the limited programming experience is only partial true. It is only true if you have only easy applications, as you have already said. I personally also can't stand the mixing between an IDE and "easy to use"-forms.

I agree about limited programming experience: you'll only create the most basic forms and reports, and having almost no experience i'd think you'd shy away from even option pages in fear of breaking something. Same thing goes for even basic db and server administration: i wouldn't like to rely on such a person when there is no experienced backup (but a very small project as is apperently being described might be acceptable).
I too am only invested in the programming side.

It's also not very easy to create new templates and other things, at least in my opinion it would be much easier with other frameworks.

I'd say that the templates make things very flexible and are certainly not hard to use

And maybe even the worst thing: I think that this application is quite buggy. I don't know how many times simple deleting and new creation of a process/page/validation or whatever solved a problem, where you are simply not thinking of this solution.

Wow. I strongly disagree with this. I've maybe encountered one such thing over the course of a year and tons of forms. Not that i haven't heard of some problems on the OTN forums, but usually they had to do with upgrades.

Summary: I would only use APEX if you have application which REALLY fits it. That means just reports and forms, everything which is more results in pain debugging sessions (as this is also not easy in this environment...) and bad maintenance.

It is too bad that there are not that many large, public sites which use apex out there. As far as i'm aware, there are and have been large project involving apex, but those usually are in a corporate environment and thus are never shown off (can't be). I personally believe apex can be pushed a lot further than the basic forms+reports you mention (and i mean basic, because things will usually come down to forms+reports in this context).

Debugging does not have to be a pain though. If you provide enough debug messages and comments in your own code, that will help a great deal. Debugging the page, javascript console, and if needs be an autonomous error logging procedure to be used in your plsql packages,... I'd say there is plenty to help out (and if you're driven to this, you are working on some more complex material, and i assume that you have the knowledge to actually deal with the complexity you've set up).

And interesting point you raise lastly is maintenance though. I'd say a point on which apex should improve a lot is versioning, out of the box. Exports need to be improved so they can be broken up a lot easier.


Wow, look at that wall of text... I could've guessed this would turn out into a discussion.

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First I have to say that I am originally a PHP-Developer, and I really like this language and environment. Nevertheless I decided to do an internship this summer, where I am currently working with APEX. Together with another intern I am developing a bigger application, and I hope to give you some useful input. This only covers the development of the application, as I am not really involved in things like database administration and so on (although I have to say that a PHP Webspace with a MySQL Database also isn't to hard to administrate, especially if there are not too many users).

To start we created a few applications, just to get a feeling. Afterwards we started with the easy parts of the application. APEX is really great if you only have to build some reports and forms to edit the entries of the database. It's very fast to create these things with the integrated wizards.

But my experience is that it gets very, very hard to solve tasks which are out of this range. That doesn't mean that you can't get multiple tables in one reports, some joining of tables is also not a big problem, and can be easily achieved. But if your application needs even more than this I cannot recommend APEX, so I totally agree with your rule, that complex applications should be created in another way.

I also think that the slogan with the limited programming experience is only partial true. It is only true if you have only easy applications, as you have already said. I personally also can't stand the mixing between an IDE and "easy to use"-forms. It's also not very easy to create new templates and other things, at least in my opinion it would be much easier with other frameworks.

And maybe even the worst thing: I think that this application is quite buggy. I don't know how many times simple deleting and new creation of a process/page/validation or whatever solved a problem, where you are simply not thinking of this solution.

Summary: I would only use APEX if you have application which REALLY fits it. That means just reports and forms, everything which is more results in pain debugging sessions (as this is also not easy in this environment...) and bad maintenance.

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