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Today I've stumbled on a problem which causes my array to be corrupted. Here is a reproducible test case:

unit Unit40;

interface

type
  TVertex = record
    X, Y: Double;
  end;

  TEdge = record
    V1, V2: TVertex;
  end;
  TEdges = array of TEdge;

type
  TBoundryInfo = array of TEdges;

procedure MemoryCorrupt;

implementation

procedure MemoryCorrupt;
var
  BoundryInfo: TBoundryInfo;
  i, PointIndex, BoundryLength: Integer;
begin
  BoundryLength := 57;
  PointIndex := 0;
  SetLength(BoundryInfo, BoundryLength);
  for i := 0 to BoundryLength - 1 do
  begin
    if i <> 17 then
    begin
      SetLength(BoundryInfo[i], 1);
      BoundryInfo[i][0].V1.X := 1;
      BoundryInfo[i][0].V2.X := 1;
      BoundryInfo[i][0].V1.Y := 1;
      BoundryInfo[i][0].V2.Y := 1;
    end else
    begin
      SetLength(BoundryInfo[i], 2);
      BoundryInfo[i][0].V1.X := 1;
      BoundryInfo[i][0].V2.X := 1;
      BoundryInfo[i][0].V1.Y := 1;
      BoundryInfo[i][0].V2.Y := 1;
      BoundryInfo[i][1].V1.X := 1;
      BoundryInfo[i][1].V2.X := 1;
      BoundryInfo[i][1].V1.Y := 1;
      BoundryInfo[i][1].V2.Y := 1;
    end;
  end;
  BoundryLength := 9;
  SetLength(BoundryInfo, BoundryLength);
  Move(BoundryInfo[PointIndex+1], BoundryInfo[PointIndex],
    ((BoundryLength - 1) - PointIndex) * SizeOf(BoundryInfo[PointIndex]));
  Dec(BoundryLength);
  Finalize(BoundryInfo[BoundryLength]);
  SetLength(BoundryInfo, BoundryLength); //After this, arrays contains garbage
  BoundryInfo[0][0].V1.X := 3;
end;

end.

I guess memory corruption after last SetLength is only a symptom of bad usage of Move. Could someone explain to me what am I doing wrong and how to properly use Move in this case?

In original problem I am removing elements from BoundryInfo in a loop, that is why I am calling Finalize(BoundryInfo[BoundryLength])

share|improve this question
    
D'oh! I fell victim to horizontal scrolling. Can't diagnose a problem with code if you can't see the whole code. –  Kenneth Cochran Aug 24 '12 at 15:00
3  
The trivial solution is to stop using Move. –  David Heffernan Aug 24 '12 at 16:15
    
@DavidHeffernan I was afraid such answer that is why I wrote "...how to properly use Move in this case?" –  Wodzu Aug 24 '12 at 18:04
2  
Well, in my experience, Move is usually the wrong approach here. –  David Heffernan Aug 24 '12 at 18:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

In your code,

Move(BoundryInfo[PointIndex+1], BoundryInfo[PointIndex], 
  ((BoundryLength - 1) - PointIndex) * SizeOf(BoundryInfo[PointIndex]));

Will copy the pointer of BoundryInfo[PointIndex+1] to BoundryInfo[PointIndex]. This pointer is another dynamic array, you have to take care of reference counting.

That is:

SetLength(BoundryInfo[PointIndex],0); // release memory
Move(BoundryInfo[PointIndex+1], BoundryInfo[PointIndex], 
  ((BoundryLength - 1) - PointIndex) * SizeOf(BoundryInfo[PointIndex]));
PPointerArray(BoundryInfo)^[BoundryLength-1] := nil; // avoid GPF

In short:

  • Finalize the item which will be overriden during move();
  • Write nil to the latest item, which is duplicated by the move().
share|improve this answer
3  
@Wodzu - Use this move hack only if you understand the memory layout of the data and how reference counting works. Otherwise forget it. –  user246408 Aug 24 '12 at 15:54
2  
I showed code similar to that in my article on how to delete items from a dynamic array. –  Rob Kennedy Aug 24 '12 at 15:57
    
@RobKennedy very instructive, thanks for sharing the link. –  Wodzu Aug 24 '12 at 18:04
    
Move can safely be used using the swap idiom: MyPointer := TheArray[Itemindex]; Move(TheArray[ItemIndex + 1], TheArray[ItemIndex], NumOfItems); Ponter(TheArray[High(TheArray)]) := MyPointer; Setlength(TheArray, High(TheArray));. That way, items were only swapped around, none disappeared so all reference counts are still valid and Setlength will take care of finalization if necessary. –  Rudy Velthuis Aug 25 '12 at 7:40

By using Move and subverting the dynamic array reference counting mechanism you are simply setting a trap for yourself. I would strongly recommend that you stick within the standard mechanisms, and let the compiler worry about the details. It will get them right every time.

for i := 0 to high(BoundaryInfo)-1 do
  BoundaryInfo[i] := BoundaryInfo[i+1];
SetLength(BoundaryInfo, Length(BoundaryInfo)-1);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for correcting the spelling David I appreciate it. –  Wodzu Aug 24 '12 at 18:08
    
That only works if you delete the first item, ISTM. i should probably start at PointIndex. But even in such situations, Move can be used, if you use the swap idiom (see my comment above). –  Rudy Velthuis Aug 25 '12 at 7:47
    
@Rudy Well, you can jut start your loop at the item you want to delete. In the code in the Q, PointIndex=0. Of course Move can be used but why would you want to do so? Why is it better than assignment? –  David Heffernan Aug 25 '12 at 8:11
1  
David's code is simpler and more readable, and probably the For loop will continue to work even if the BoundaryInfo record got more complex, although perhaps Move() is faster. But when it comes to faster versus readable, I would always pick more readable, except where it's really necessary. If I was the lead dev I'd insist on rewriting the code to be as simple and readable as possible, and avoid using Move to copy an entire array. That kind of thing is fragile. I would personally use Move to copy a single record, or a byte or char buffer, but not an array of records. Too many quirks. –  Warren P Aug 25 '12 at 20:27
    
@David: Move is a lot faster than a loop, if more than a few must be moved. So generally, if I write something like an arrayed list which can delete items from anywhere else but the top, I use Move. –  Rudy Velthuis Aug 26 '12 at 11:17

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