Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm looking for some guidance on how to implement logic to either create a new/empty document, or open an existing document, during startup of a WPF application which uses MVVM and DI.

To clarify, the behavior I'm talking about is the common behavior you see when starting an Office application like Word or Excel. If you start the application directly (Start menu, taskbar, desktop shortcut, etc.), a new blank document or spreadsheet is created for you; but if you double-click an existing .docx or .xlsx file, the application starts up and opens the existing document/spreadsheet instead, bypassing the creation of a new document entirely.

In the case of our application, we need the application window to be shown without any document open before we execute the logic to either create a new empty document, or open an existing document (passed as a command-line argument).

Currently we're using an IoC container which is configured in int Main(string[]), and we inject the main application ViewModel (with no active document) into the constructor of our main window, then call app.Run(mainWindow);.

My initial attempt at accomplishing this was to hook up a handler to the mainWindow.Loaded event and put the new/open document logic there (executing the New or Open commands exposed by the ViewModel, the same ones that are hooked up to the New and Open buttons in our application menu). However, the Loaded event is firing before the window is displayed, which is a problem because it's possible that an existing document in an older format is being opened, and we need to display prompts to the user asking them if they would like us to upgrade their file (similar to how Visual Studio has a wizard for upgrading a solution in an older format, with options to create a backup). Those prompts must be displayed as modal windows which are children of the main application window.

Any suggestions on best practices for implementing this type of behavior?

EDIT

In this particular implementation the underlying question is how to deterministically know when the main window is fully rendered and shown on the screen, and execute some code afterwards. From reading other questions on SO and elsewhere, it sounds like there is no official/built-in way to do that? I've read about using the Dispatcher to Invoke a delegate with a low priority so that it won't happen until after the rendering is complete, but that seems like a hack, not to mention the performance issues associated with thread context switching.

That being said, I'm open to other suggestions on how to implement the desired behavior (creating a new/opening an existing document after the window has been shown).

share|improve this question
    
are you sure loaded is being fired before the Window is shown? I just created a simple test app showing a MessageBox in Window.Loaded and it's happening in the following order: Visible Changed, Activated, Loaded. By the time Loaded is called the Window is visible to the user –  pickles Aug 24 '12 at 14:31
    
@pickles: Interesting. In my actual application, Loaded fires before Activated. However, in a test app I just created, I get the same results you did: Activated before Loaded. Dunno what the difference is... –  mjl5007 Aug 24 '12 at 15:04
    
@pickles: Turns out it's the window. We're using Actipro's RibbonWindow, not WPF's System.Windows.Window, and the startup behavior is different. Just switching the test app from WPF's Window to the Actipro one makes it behave like our application. Ugh. –  mjl5007 Aug 24 '12 at 15:13

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Just recording this for future folks..

Are you sure loaded is being fired before the Window is shown?

I just created a simple test app showing a MessageBox in Window.Loaded and it's happening in the following order:

Visible Changed Activated Loaded

By the time Loaded is called the Window is visible to the user

Update from OP:

Turns out it's the window. We're using Actipro's RibbonWindow, not WPF's System.Windows.Window, and the startup behavior is different. Just switching the test app from WPF's Window to the Actipro one makes it behave like our application. Ugh

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.