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I just started on learning perl, and in the sample code given by my book there is this line:

#!/usr/bin/perl
@lines = `perldoc -u -f atan2`;
foreach (@lines) {
s/\w<([^>]+)>/\U$1/g;
print;
}

the code works, that's not the problem. Also by observing the input and output I know that this line:

s/\w<([^>]+)>/\U$1/g;

does this

ATAN2 ARCTANGENT TAN TANGENT <--- X<atan2> X<arctangent> X<tan> X<tangent>

and this

MATH::TRIG::TAN <------- C<Math::Trig::tan>

My question is: where does the X and the C come from?


As an FYI: here is my output if I don't use the code:

perldoc -u -f atan2
=over 8

=item atan2 Y,X
X<atan2> X<arctangent> X<tan> X<tangent>

Returns the arctangent of Y/X in the range -PI to PI.

For the tangent operation, you may use the C<Math::Trig::tan>
function, or use the familiar relation:

    sub tan { sin($_[0]) / cos($_[0])  }

The return value for C<atan2(0,0)> is implementation-defined; consult
your atan2(3) manpage for more information.

=back

And here is the complete output from the code:

[/cygdrive/c/Users/Documents/learn_perl]$ ./hello_world.pl 
=over 8

=item atan2 Y,X
ATAN2 ARCTANGENT TAN TANGENT

Returns the arctangent of Y/X in the range -PI to PI.

For the tangent operation, you may use the MATH::TRIG::TAN
function, or use the familiar relation:

    sub tan { sin($_[0]) / cos($_[0])  }

The return value for ATAN2(0,0) is implementation-defined; consult
your atan2(3) manpage for more information.

=back
share|improve this question
    
The regular expression is taking what is in the angle brackets and making it uppercase. It appears to me that the direction you describe is in reverse. –  Richard Chambers Aug 24 '12 at 15:13
1  
As we say at the beginning of Learning Perl, you're not supposed to try to understand that code. Go through the book, do all of the exercises, and when you're done, go back to that. :) –  brian d foy Aug 24 '12 at 15:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The substitution regex

s/\w<([^>]+)>/\U$1/g;

Finds an alphanumeric character (X and C in the sample text), followed by <, captures any characters that are not >, followed by a >. Then it puts the captured string back, with the escape sequence \U which turns it into upper case.

My question is: where does the X and the C come from?

They were already in the perldoc text. They were however removed by the substitution regex. Perhaps you got input and output confused.

share|improve this answer
    
so it finds any character before a < strips out that character and the <> pair, and then makes whatever is between <> into uppercase? –  D.Zou Aug 24 '12 at 15:17
    
It finds one alphanumeric character, yes. You may also note the global /g option which makes perl perform all possible replacements on the line (instead of only the first match). –  TLP Aug 24 '12 at 15:19

Are you sure you're not confusing your input & output? The code looks to me like it would convert "z<something>" into "SOMETHING".

share|improve this answer

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