Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

So I have a Retrieve() function, which either gets me an object or a null (if that object is not found). I'm using an if statement with a boolean attribute of that object. It's set up like this.

if(Retrieve(index).IsForm == true) {}

The issue with this is that if it doesn't find an object, it'll throw a null reference exception. There are some ways around this, of course, but none that I find concise. There's a try...catch, but that seems pointless when I expect the error. I can check if the object is null first, if(Retrieve(index) != null), but that seems like adding needless nesting. Is there a clever way to handle this? I thought of using the null coalescing operator but it doesn't work in this situation.

share|improve this question
    
I don't think there is any more concise way to do it, no. –  Chris Aug 24 '12 at 16:59
1  
Conciseness is not always the best way. Readability is generally far more important. –  Darren Young Aug 24 '12 at 17:00
    
Depending on your situation you could use a Null Object pattern. See this question stackoverflow.com/q/11972281/1066291. –  Mark Rucker Aug 24 '12 at 17:02

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can either call the method twice:

if(Retrieve(index) != null && Retrieve(index).IsForm == true) { }

Or you can break the lines apart and store the result before the if:

var result = Retrieve(index);
if(result != null && result.IsForm == true) { }
share|improve this answer

You could write an IsForm function to do both operations for you:

bool IsForm(int index)
{
    var result = Retrieve(index);
    return result != null && result.IsForm;
}

if (IsForm(index))
    ...
share|improve this answer

The Null Object pattern would be helpful here. It keeps your calling code clean but does add an additional class.

class NullWhatever : Whatever
{
    public NullWhatever() { IsForm = false; } 
}


Whatever Retrieve(...) 
{
     ...
     return new NullWhatever();  // instead of null
}
share|improve this answer
    
Jinx. I just said the same thing in the comments :) –  Mark Rucker Aug 24 '12 at 17:04

You could make a Nullable_IsForm extension method. Then you could check for the null condition.

public static class RetrieveExtension
{
    public static bool? Nullable_IsForm(this Retrieve retrieved)
    {
        if(retrieved == null)
        {
            return null;
        }
        else
        {
            return retrieved.IsForm;
        }
    }
}

Then in your code you'd check it against bool values

if(Retrieve(index).Nullable_IsForm == true) 
{}
else if (Retrieve(index).Nullable_IsForm == false) 
{}
else if (Retrieve(index).Nullable_IsForm == null ) 
{}
share|improve this answer

I don't think there is any more concise way to do it, no.

Shortest I can think of is:

if(Retrieve(index)!=null && Retrieve(index).IsForm == true) {}

but I don't like this because it calls Retrieve(index) multiple times. I'd go for

var foo = Retrieve(index);
if(foo!=null && foo.IsForm == true) {}

but that is obviously not doing anything clever or more concise. It is probably more efficeint than some of the alternatives.

share|improve this answer

You could put both conditions in the same if:

if(Retrieve(index)!= null && Retrieve(index).IsForm == true) {}

Thanks to short-circuit, if the null-check fails, rest of the expression is not evaluated.

share|improve this answer
    
calling Retrieve twice? What if it's slow? –  Austin Salonen Aug 24 '12 at 17:05
    
just split in two statements: var whatever = Retrieve(index); if(whatever!=null && whatever.IsForm) {} –  Timoteo Brasil Aug 24 '12 at 17:08

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.