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I am trying to play with __attribute__ to allow a function to be essentially compiled with different flags from the rest of the code. For example:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

void MyNormalFunction();

void MyDebugabbleFunction() __attribute__((optimize(0)));

void MyNormalFunction()
{
  std::cout << "Test" << std::endl;

  std::vector<int> a;

  for(unsigned int i = 0; i < 10; ++i)
  {
    a.push_back(i);
  }
}

void MyDebugabbleFunction()
{
  std::cout << "Test" << std::endl;

  std::vector<int> a;

  for(unsigned int i = 0; i < 10; ++i)
  {
    a.push_back(i);
  }
}

int main()
{
  MyNormalFunction();
  MyDebugabbleFunction();
  return 0;
}

I am building with -g -O2, but I want to be able to sanely debug MyDebugabbleFunction() — so I used the __attribute__((optimize(0))) on its declaration. However, I can't really tell any difference when stepping through these two functions with a debugger. I would expect the "seemingly erratic" behavior that I usually see when trying to step through optimized code in MyNormalFunction, but the standard "-g"-only debugger behavior in MyDebuggableFunction.

Is it that I have done something wrong with __attribute__? Or that I have used bad demo code (i.e. code that doesn't get "optimized a lot") inside the two functions? Or am I misinterpreting what the difference is supposed to be in the debugger?

I am using gcc 4.6.


EDIT based on GManNickG's suggestion

I used this code instead, and built with -O2 -g:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

int MyNormalFunction();

int MyDebugabbleFunction() __attribute__((optimize(0)));

int MyNormalFunction()
{
  int val = 0; // breakpoint here - debugger does NOT stop here
  val = 1;
  val = 2;
  return val;
} // debugger stops here instead

int MyDebugabbleFunction()
{
  int val = 0;  // breakpoint here - debugger stops here and steps through the next 3 lines as if it were built with only -g
  val = 1;
  val = 2;
  return val;
}

int main()
{
  int a = MyNormalFunction();
  std::cout << a << std::endl;

  int b = MyDebugabbleFunction();
  std::cout << b << std::endl;

  return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
If you're using no optimization for that function and it's still breaking where it doesn't break if optimization is off, then the problem you're looking for is in another function. –  Wug Aug 24 '12 at 17:30
    
A better test might be int foo() { int val = 0; val = 1; val = 2; return val; }. Then in main just print out the return value of each function. –  GManNickG Aug 24 '12 at 17:30
    
Wug - no no, there are no problems with these functions. They are just trying to demonstrate the affect of using this attribute command. @GManNickG - so the idea is that with optimization (MyNormalFunction) the debugger will skip the =0 and =1 lines all together, but without optimization (MyDebugabbleFunction) it will hit all of the lines? –  David Doria Aug 24 '12 at 17:34
    
the debugger is quite clever, you better check the generated code gcc -S –  Karoly Horvath Aug 24 '12 at 17:40
1  
@GManNickG - yes, it works as I'd expect with your suggestion. If you create an answer (you can take the code that I just posted in an EDIT block in the original post) , I'll accept it. –  David Doria Aug 24 '12 at 17:40
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try a test like this instead:

int MyNormalFunction()
{
    int val = 0;
    val = 1;
    val = 2;

    // should optimize to return 2
    return val;
}

int MyDebuggableFunction() __attribute__((optimize(0)));
{
    int val = 0;
    val = 1;
    val = 2;

    // could optimize to return 2, but attribute blocks that
    return val;
}

int main()
{
    // we need to actually output the return values,
    // or main itself could be optimized to nothing
    std::cout << MyNormalFunction() << std::endl;
    std::cout << MyDebuggableFunction() << std::endl;
}

It'll make it much easier to follow.


Note that you should start in main, when stepping through, because it most likely will be reduced to:

int main()
{
    std::cout << 2 << std::endl;
    std::cout << MyDebuggableFunction() << std::endl;
}

If you're up for it, looking at the disassembly makes this task much easier.

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After fixing the errors in the code, so it compiles:

g++ -S x.c

_Z16MyNormalFunctionv:
.LFB1255:
    .cfi_startproc
    movl    $2, %eax
    ret

_Z20MyDebuggableFunctionv:
.LFB1256:
    .cfi_startproc
    movl    $0, -4(%rsp)
    movl    $1, -4(%rsp)
    movl    $2, -4(%rsp)
    movl    -4(%rsp), %eax
    ret

As you can see the optimization attribute worked fine.

share|improve this answer
    
sure, but I was looking for a demo that I could see the difference when stepping through with a debugger. What errors did you have to fix? (It compiled fine for me). –  David Doria Aug 24 '12 at 17:57
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