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I'm having difficulties with a question from a past exam paper. I'm trying to multiply a from number to a n number. In other words: from*(from+1)(from+2)...*n.

I need to solve this problem by using a while loop. I have done this so far and not sure what to do. I know the code is wrong but have been stuck for a while.

public class Fact {

    public int last;

    private int factPartND(final int from, final int n) {
        int fromNum = from;
        int toNum = n;
        int result = 1;
        int c = 1;

        while (fromNum <= toNum) {  // e.g.5*6*7*8*9*10*11
            result = (fromNum) * (fromNum + c);  // calculate 5*6
            final int temp = result;  // store 5*6
            int result1 = temp * (fromNum + c);  // store 5*6*7*....
            c++;  // increments the fromNum in the while code
            fromNum++;  // increments 5 to 11 in the while condition
            last = result1;
        }
        return last;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Fact f = new Fact();
        System.out.println(test);
    }
}
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6  
You look to be grossly over complicating this. Figure out how you'd do this on paper first, and then code it. Simplify. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Aug 24 '12 at 18:08
    
is this homework? –  Colin D Aug 24 '12 at 18:10
    
I tried that initially but i couldn't find a way of not multiplying by the inital fromNum, as i kept on mulitplying by that number through each iteration. –  nsc010 Aug 24 '12 at 18:11
    
@ColinD, no this is a question from a past paper, i have an exam soon –  nsc010 Aug 24 '12 at 18:13
    
@Colin D it says in the question that it's an old exam paper? thus not homework –  Matti Lyra Aug 24 '12 at 18:13

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted
int result = 1;
for (int i = from; i <= to; i++) result *= i;
System.out.println("Result is " + result);

Strictly while:

int result = 1, i = from;
while (i <= to) result *= i++;
System.out.println("Result is " + result);
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this doesn't use a while loop –  Colin D Aug 24 '12 at 18:22
    
@ColinD Indeed it doesn't. @nsc010 Are you really required to use while and nothing else? A strange requirement. –  Marko Topolnik Aug 24 '12 at 18:23
    
@MarkoTopolnik it's an exam exercise. These tend to get like this. BTW, I don't think reducing this to a single line is a good example for beginners. The Java Code Standard is just a convention but a very useful one IMHO. I've seen too many mistakes caused by this kind of freedom just too many a time. –  toniedzwiedz Aug 24 '12 at 18:24
    
@Tom I guess you are right. It's automatic for me. BTW I never saw a mistake from this, or at least not any more often than any other kind of mistake. –  Marko Topolnik Aug 24 '12 at 18:25
1  
@Tom There's actually an emacs minor mode that greys out the parens :) But when checking syntax, you just position the cursor over an open paren and immediately see how far that S-expr reaches. It's really, really easy, much easier than checking Java syntax. Plus editing with paredit is like a new world. –  Marko Topolnik Aug 24 '12 at 18:44

I think this should work as the while loop

int offset = 0;
int result = fromNum;
while (offset < toNum - fromNum) {
  offset++;
  result *= fromNum+offset;
}
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some psuedocode:

result = from;
temp = from+1;
while(temp <= n) {
  result*=temp;
  temp++;
}
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int c = 0;

int result = fromNum;

while ((fromNum+c) < toNum ) {
  c++;
  result = result*(fromNum+c);
}

return result;

Try this quicky.. hope it helps :-)

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1  
this is currently wrong. your loop checks if fromNum < toNum, but you never increment fromNum. Also, result*fromNum+c = (result*fromNum)+c –  Colin D Aug 24 '12 at 18:26

I'm going to attempt to answer this question somewhat more broadly, than just focusing on your while loop. Please note the comments:

public class Fact {//I assume, based on your question, you really mean 'Factorial'.
    //Examining this for the first time I might assume that this object has to do with 
    //well-established observations, or 'Facts'. Fight the urge to abbreviate everything.

    public int last;//Why is this a member variable of the class?

    private int factPartND(final int from, final int n) {
        //How are your 'from' and 'n' variables related? It's unclear based on their names.
        //The method name is also incomprehensible.
        //Why are the parameters declared 'final'?
        //Why is this a private method?
        //Why is this not a static method?

        int fromNum = from;//If you're redeclaring, there is probably a problem.
        int toNum = n;
        int result = 1;//Is this your default result? You should be notating it in the method
            //comments if you're assuming some things, like no negative numbers.
        int c = 1;//What is c?


        //You have latched on to 'while' as the only way of doing this.
        while (fromNum <= toNum) {  // e.g.5*6*7*8*9*10*11
            result = (fromNum) * (fromNum + c);  // calculate 5*6
               //And then set result to the result? What about what was in there before?
            final int temp = result;  // store 5*6
               //Why is this int final?
            int result1 = temp * (fromNum + c);  // store 5*6*7*....
            c++;  // increments the fromNum in the while code
               //Actually increments the adder to what you're multiplying by three lines earlier
            fromNum++;  // increments 5 to 11 in the while condition
            last = result1;
               //Your use of temporary variables is way overdone and confusing.
        }
        return last;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Fact f = new Fact();
        System.out.println(test);
    }
}

Consider, rather than writing a function of STATEMENTS that DO something, you want to write EXPRESSIONS that RETURN things.

public class Factorial {

  /** 
   *  Calculates the product of a series of integers from 'start' to 'end'. 'start' must be
   *  less than or equal to 'end', or it will return 1.
   */ 
  public static factorialRange(int start, int end) {
    if (start > end) { return 1; }

    if (start = end) { return end; }

    return start * factorialRange(start + 1, end);
  }

}

Note that this solution is, essentially, three lines long. It takes advantage of the fact that your problem breaks down into a slightly smaller problem. It also handles your edge cases gracefully (and comments on the expected result).

Note, too, that there are performance implications of this method (a 'recursive' method), but that premature optimization is the root of all evil, just as there are clarity issues with your first attempt.

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1  
Good answer. I was just about to refer to the re-declaration in a comment. +1 –  toniedzwiedz Aug 24 '12 at 18:30
    
@Nathaniel Ford, Thanks for making the comments that you have. The line: private int factPartND(final int from, final int n) and having to use a while loop was given to me to use as a part of the question. However I was responsible for the rest of the code. I'll go over your feedback and try to implement them for future coding. Thanks for taking the time out to make the comments. –  nsc010 Aug 24 '12 at 18:39
1  
@nsc010 No problem! I would advise, however, even in an academic setting to constantly question things; if someone gives you a ridiculous signature to implement, call it out. Why is it that way if something obvious might be better? The worst case is they make you implement it as-is, but in all cases people recognize that you're really thinking about the problem. –  Nathaniel Ford Aug 24 '12 at 18:41
    
@NathanielFord final params, at least effectively final (could be marked final with no compilation error), are actually a widely recommended practice. –  Marko Topolnik Aug 24 '12 at 19:39
    
@MarkoTopolnik Don't get me wrong; I'm not opposed to them being final, but only if it makes sense. The writer needs to understand why that's the case; otherwise you're mostly just copying and pasting and occluding what the method does. –  Nathaniel Ford Aug 24 '12 at 21:40

Here's a simple version of your central method:

private int factPartND(final int from, final int n) {
    int f = from;
    int result = 1;

    while (f <= n) {
        result *= f++;
    }
    return result;
}

If you removed the final modifier on the from argument, you then can eliminate the local variable f:

private int factPartND(int from, final int n) {
    int result = 1;

    while (from <= n) {
        result *= from++;
    }
    return result;
}

Simple!

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