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This may seem like a very basic question but I did not seem to find an answer to it. I know it is possible to define a css rule for more than one element at once as such:

.element1, .element2{
  font-size:14px;
}

Is it possible, though, to do that exact same thing, but apply the css to element after the css for element1 has been defined? Something like this:

.element1{
  font-size:14px;
}

/*later in the css... or in a separate file*/

.element2{
 like:".element1";
 font-weight:bold;
}

So that element2 now inherits the css of element one. The reason I am trying to do this is because I have a css definition for an element1 that loads for all pages of the site. Then, for one particular page (that loads the main css file, along with its own) I would like to use the style from element1 and add to it. What I am trying to avoid is loading the definition for element2 for all pages on the site (including those who don't even have element[s] with the class element2.

Could this be done? I realize I could easily achieve this with jQuery (i.e. $(".element2").addClass(".element1");) but I would like to avoid using scripts for my css.

Thanks!

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5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You can use:

<div class="element1 element2">

while having

.element1{
  font-size:14px;
}

.element2{
  font-weight:bold;
}

and so both classes will apply. jQuery is smart enough to add classes and remove classes like this.

Also you can use something more advanced like SASS that alows mixins.

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Nice! i never knew something like SASS existed. Amazingly cool, though I probably won't use this is my project. Although I am familiar with the first method you outlined, it did give me an idea. Many thanks! –  yuval Jul 31 '09 at 9:36
    
What he said. If you want your ".element2" objects to have the style of ".element1" objects, just give them the class ".element1". –  Alsciende Jul 31 '09 at 10:04

As far as I'm aware, no, this isn't possible with CSS alone. You've already identified one way of achieving your aims, and I'd have to suggest that it's the better way.

In CSS a class can only inherit from its parent, and then only if <example-attribute>: inherit; (I've used this with color:, background-color:, font-family:, font-size: among others, though I warn you that if the font-size of the parent a size described as an increase or decrease, the font-size will change in the child, too.

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thank you for your answer :) –  yuval Jul 31 '09 at 9:36

CSS really needs this functionality. Specifying multiple classes at the element level is great, but not the same as being able to go:

.my_class { class:my_global_class; }

Being able to have a class use styles from another class, would be very powerfull. It would move this part of the inheritance model into the CSS where it belongs, leaving less cluttered markup.

I'm working on a site right now, where we have lots of different combinations of fonts. Some h and p tags look different depending on their page and context. It's a real pain having to have our list of fonts for font-family having to exist in every class where we need them. I'd love to be able to do this:

/* defualt for p tags */
p { font-family:Times, Arial, Helvetica; }

/* exceptions */
.arial {font-family:Arial, Times, Helvetica; }
.segoe {font-family:Segoe, Arial, Helvetica; }

.my-page1 p {class:arial;}
.my-page2 p {class:segoe;}

In the above, my list of fonts would exist in one central place and I can apply them where ever I want, purely in the CSS file. If I have 100 p tags in my site, then I have to add a "class" to each of them for those exceptions, which can be a pain. This is especially true, when you have multiple developers working on one site.

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From what you describe you want .element1 to be available and used on several pages, but on a few exceptional pages you want elements implementing the .element1 class to look different, in your example bold.

The answer you were given is definitely one approach and will definitely work. Something else you can do though is to include additional CSS on the exceptional pages.

For example you can have an allpages.css that is include in all pages and contains the CSS:

.element1 {
    font-size: 14px;
}

Then you can have a separate CSS file called exceptions.css that contains:

.element1 {
    font-weight: bold;
}

This works because when multiple rules are defined for the same selector the rules are merged together. Using this technique you wouldn't have to modify the class values for HTML elements.

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Syntax like that used in http://lesscss.org/
I hope you'll find some useful staff there

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