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I've seen some variations of this quesiton asked here, but I'm not sure how to apply them to my situation, so I'm hoping maybe someone can help me here.

I have a flat XML file in a format similar to this one:

<item id="1"/>
<item id="1.1"/>
<item id="1.1.1"/>
<item id="1.1.2"/>
<item id="1.1.2.1"/>
<item id="1.2"/>
<item id="1.3"/>

I'm looking to set up the tags hierarchically based on the id attribute, like so:

<item id="1">
  <item id="1.1">
    <item id="1.1.1"/>
    <item id="1.1.2">
      <item id="1.1.2.1"/>
    </item>
  </item>
  <item id="1.2"/>
  <item id="1.3"/>
</item>

Some of the id values have two digit numbers (e.g., "1.2.3.15.1") which makes comparing them even more challenging.

Help?

share|improve this question
    
What's your terminating condition. What you need to do is, have a function that calls itself recursively with values like 1,1.1,1.2,1.3.. 1.nnn then, for each of them, call again, 1.1.1, 1.1.2 etc. Each series have to end at your predefined condition. –  srini.venigalla Aug 24 '12 at 19:58
    
An optimization can be to collect all attributes first, sorth them in the order you need and call only those attributes, so your termination is not hard coded.. –  srini.venigalla Aug 24 '12 at 19:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Selecting the correct nodes can be tricky but as you have no hierarchy this works for your sample input (if you add a root element to it)

  <!-- start somewhere -->
  <xsl:template match="/root">
    <root>
      <!-- select all with no . in the id -->
      <xsl:apply-templates  select="//item[string-length(translate(@id,'1234567890',''))=0]" />
    </root>
  </xsl:template>

  <xsl:template match="item">
    <xsl:variable name="id" select="@id"/>
    <!-- how many . have we ? That is how deep we are and add 1 -->
    <xsl:variable name="deep" select="string-length(translate(@id,'1234567890',''))+1" />
    <xsl:copy>
      <!-- copy attribs over -->
      <xsl:apply-templates select="@*"/> 
      <!-- select all nodes that start with our curent id,  
           select nodes that are just one level below us 
           and don't select our selfs-->
      <xsl:apply-templates select="//item[starts-with(@id, $id) and string-length(translate(@id,'1234567890',''))=$deep and not(@id=$id)]"/>
    </xsl:copy>
  </xsl:template>

  <!-- copy attribs -->
  <xsl:template match="@*">
    <xsl:copy />
  </xsl:template>
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. This one did the trick, although there was one aspect I had to correct. The input file had some IDs with two-digit numbers (e.g. 1.2.3.11), which made the node selection fail. I fixed that by formatting the IDs as two-digit numbers (e.g. 01.02.03.11) as a first-pass transformation. –  NestorDRod Aug 28 '12 at 20:01

I. Here is a simple XSLT 2.0 solution (and a similar XSLT 1.0 solution follows after this one):

<xsl:stylesheet version="2.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"
    xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:my="my:my">
    <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>

 <xsl:template match="/*">
     <xsl:sequence select="my:grouping(*, 1)"/>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:function name="my:grouping" as="element()*">
  <xsl:param name="pNodes" as="element()*"/>
  <xsl:param name="pLevel" as="xs:integer"/>

  <xsl:if test="$pNodes">
      <xsl:for-each-group select="$pNodes" group-by="tokenize(@id, '\.')[$pLevel]">
       <xsl:copy>
         <xsl:copy-of select="@*"/>
         <xsl:sequence select="
          my:grouping(current-group()[tokenize(@id, '\.')[$pLevel+1]], $pLevel+1)"/>
       </xsl:copy>
  </xsl:for-each-group>
  </xsl:if>
 </xsl:function>
</xsl:stylesheet>

When this transformation is applied on this XML document (the provided XML fragment, wrapped within a single top element to make it a well-formed XML document):

<t>
    <item id="1"/>
    <item id="1.1"/>
    <item id="1.1.1"/>
    <item id="1.1.2"/>
    <item id="1.1.2.1"/>
    <item id="1.2"/>
    <item id="1.3"/>
</t>

the wanted, correct result is produced:

<item id="1">
   <item id="1.1">
      <item id="1.1.1"/>
      <item id="1.1.2">
         <item id="1.1.2.1"/>
      </item>
   </item>
   <item id="1.2"/>
   <item id="1.3"/>
</item>

II. Here is a similar XSLT 1.0 solution:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <xsl:key name="kFollowing" match="item"
   use="generate-id(preceding-sibling::*
                     [string-length(current()/@id) > string-length(@id)
                    and
                      starts-with(current()/@id, concat(@id, '.'))]
                       [1])"/>

 <xsl:template match="/*">
     <xsl:call-template name="grouping">
      <xsl:with-param name="pNodes" select="*"/>
      <xsl:with-param name="pLevel" select="1"/>
     </xsl:call-template>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template name="grouping">
  <xsl:param name="pNodes"/>
  <xsl:param name="pLevel" select="1"/>

  <xsl:for-each select=
    "$pNodes[$pLevel > string-length(@id) - string-length(translate(@id, '.', ''))]">
   <xsl:copy>
     <xsl:copy-of select="@*"/>

     <xsl:call-template name="grouping">
       <xsl:with-param name="pNodes" select="key('kFollowing', generate-id())"/>
         <xsl:with-param name="pLevel" select="$pLevel+1"/>
     </xsl:call-template>
   </xsl:copy>
  </xsl:for-each>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

When this XSLT 1.0 transformation is applied on the same document (above), the same wanted, correct result is produced:

<item id="1">
   <item id="1.1">
      <item id="1.1.1"/>
      <item id="1.1.2">
         <item id="1.1.2.1"/>
      </item>
   </item>
   <item id="1.2"/>
   <item id="1.3"/>
</item>
share|improve this answer

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