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I am trying to understand the .read(input) and .write(output) functions autogenerated by Thrift for javascript.

I cannot find any documentation on how to interact with these functions that are part of the Javascript objects.

links or descriptions?

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So for each data structure that you have defined in your .thrift file, Apache Thrift will generate for you a class, containing read and write methods, meant for the serialization (write) and deserialization (read) of the objects from that type.

Now read and write methods take both as parameter a Protocol and a protocol is created given a Transport. You can find what a Protocol and Transport mean in the context of Thrift at the following link:

http://anomalizer.net/statistically-incorrect/2010/11/introduction-thrift-serialization/

The picture and description of Thrift's layers on wikipedia might help as well understanding how the data is passed between different layers.

Now I haven't tried this in Javascript, but the libraries for the different languages supported by thrift look quite similar. So in Python this is how read-write methods are used:

//SERIALIZATION:
transportOut = TTransport.TMemoryBuffer()
protocolOut = TBinaryProtocol.TBinaryProtocol(transportOut)
work.write(protocolOut)
bytes = transportOut.getvalue() # the string 'bytes' can be written out to disk 
                            #  to be read in at a different time

// DESERIALIZATION
transportIn = TTransport.TMemoryBuffer(bytes)
protocolIn = TBinaryProtocol.TBinaryProtocol(transportIn)
moreWork = Work()
moreWork.read(protocolIn)

HTH

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