Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am trying to locate the last record within the selected date using the sub query method. The problem is the query is too slow. I am wondering if anyone have any ideas on how to rewrite this query to improve the performance. My server is dying because of this.
To make it easier for testing I have created a table variable to generate fake data for testing purposes. To test this script please run usp_ExtractData'400000'

My concern is at ---SECTION B My result was 18 seconds for 400000*3 = 1200000 records. On the real database i do index it and re-index nightly.

--Store proceedure with table variable data

ALTER PROCEDURE [dbo].[usp_ExtractData](
@TotalRecord int--Create random records for each product
)

AS
BEGIN
    --MS SQL 2008
    SET NOCOUNT ON;

    --SECTION 1--Create test data--- GO TO SECTION 2
        --Create Variable table to Products fake data
        DECLARE @Product TABLE
        (
          ProductID int primary  key not null
          ,SKU varchar(100) not null
        )
        --Insert couple records into @Product table
        INSERT INTO @Product(ProductID, SKU) VALUES     (100,'CUP100')
        INSERT INTO @Product(ProductID, SKU) VALUES     (101,'CUP101')
        INSERT INTO @Product(ProductID, SKU) VALUES     (102,'MUG101')

        --Create Variable table to hold Products History data
        DECLARE @History TABLE
        (
           ID int identity not null
          ,ProductID int not null
          ,VisitedDatetime datetime not null
        )

        --Generate random record for testing
        WHILE @TotalRecord>0
            BEGIN
                INSERT INTO  @History( ProductID, VisitedDatetime) VALUES (100,DATEADD(minute,rand()*100,GETDATE()))
                INSERT INTO  @History( ProductID, VisitedDatetime) VALUES (101,DATEADD(minute,rand()*100,GETDATE()))
                INSERT INTO  @History( ProductID, VisitedDatetime) VALUES (102,DATEADD(minute,rand()*100,GETDATE()))
                set @TotalRecord=@TotalRecord-1
            END
    --SECTION 1--Finised creating test data



    ---SECTION B 

      --SELECTION B1- SEE DATA
      SELECT * FROM @History         ORDER BY ProductID, VisitedDatetime DESC
        --Run query to find the last visit per each ProductID

        --THIS IS TOO SLOW
        DECLARE @TestPerformanceDatetime datetime--Test performance
        SET @TestPerformanceDatetime= GETDATE()
        SELECT  *, (select top(1) VisitedDatetime FROM @History as t2 WHERE t2.ProductID=ProductID and VisitedDatetime BETWEEN GETDATE() AND GETDATE()+10 ORDER BY VisitedDatetime DESC) as LastVistiDate
        FROM     @Product

        --Display the performance
        SELECT  DATEDIFF(SECOND, @TestPerformanceDatetime,getdate()) AS TotalSeconds
    ---SECTION B - End
END
share|improve this question
    
What version of SQL Server? – Joe Stefanelli Aug 24 '12 at 20:42
    
Yes, Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2 – TEST MASTER Aug 24 '12 at 21:27
1  
Using GetDate() within a query is chasing a moving target, impacts performance, and may produce curious results, e.g. as the date changes. It is almost always a better idea to capture the current date/time in a variable and then use that value as needed. This is more important across multiple statements as in a stored procedure. The most common reason to use GetDate() multiple times is when capturing the start and end times for a long running operation. – HABO Aug 24 '12 at 22:20
    
Is there an index on the History table in production, e.g. a composite key with ProductId and VisitedDateTime descending? That should help you select max( VisitedDateTime ) from History where ProductId = Outer.ProductId. – HABO Aug 24 '12 at 22:24
    
yes, we do have 2 indexes(ProductID and VisitedDateTime) for the History and 1 index(ProductID) for Product table. The GETDATE() is just for testing purpose. – TEST MASTER Aug 24 '12 at 22:50
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use a cross apply and max().

select *
from @Product p
cross apply (
    select MAX(VisitedDatetime) LastVisitedDatetime
    from @History
    where VisitedDatetime BETWEEN GETDATE() AND GETDATE()+10
        and ProductID = p.ProductID
) h
share|improve this answer
    
the max really improve the speed – TEST MASTER Aug 27 '12 at 16:25

I was getting 0 seconds with original version of this query, so I upped the number of random test records from 400,000 to 4,000,000.

CREATE PROCEDURE [dbo].[usp_ExtractData_test](
@TotalRecord int--Create random records for each product
)

AS
BEGIN
    --MS SQL 2008
    SET NOCOUNT ON;

    --SECTION 1--Create test data--- GO TO SECTION 2
        --Create Variable table to Products fake data
        DECLARE @Product TABLE
        (
          ProductID int primary  key not null
          ,SKU varchar(100) not null
        )
        --Insert couple records into @Product table
        INSERT INTO @Product(ProductID, SKU) VALUES     (100,'CUP100')
        INSERT INTO @Product(ProductID, SKU) VALUES     (101,'CUP101')
        INSERT INTO @Product(ProductID, SKU) VALUES     (102,'MUG101')

        --Create Variable table to hold Products History data
        DECLARE @History TABLE
        (
           ID int identity not null
          ,ProductID int not null
          ,VisitedDatetime datetime not null
        )

        --Generate random record for testing
        WHILE @TotalRecord>0
            BEGIN
                INSERT INTO  @History( ProductID, VisitedDatetime) VALUES (100,DATEADD(minute,rand()*100,GETDATE()))
                INSERT INTO  @History( ProductID, VisitedDatetime) VALUES (101,DATEADD(minute,rand()*100,GETDATE()))
                INSERT INTO  @History( ProductID, VisitedDatetime) VALUES (102,DATEADD(minute,rand()*100,GETDATE()))
                set @TotalRecord=@TotalRecord-1
            END
    --SECTION 1--Finised creating test data



    ---SECTION B 
        --Run query to find the last visit per each ProductID
        --THIS IS TOO SLOW
        DECLARE @TestPerformanceDatetime datetime--Test performance
        SET @TestPerformanceDatetime= GETDATE()
        SELECT  P.*, LastVisitDate.VisitedDatetime
        FROM     @Product P
        LEFT
        JOIN  (select top(1) T2.VisitedDatetime FROM @History as t2
               ORDER BY T2.VisitedDatetime DESC) as LastVisitDate
          ON  LastVisitDate.VisitedDatetime BETWEEN GETDATE() AND GETDATE()+10

        --Display the performance
        SELECT  DATEDIFF(SECOND, @TestPerformanceDatetime,getdate()) AS TotalSeconds
    ---SECTION B - End
END

Proof

share|improve this answer
    
The VisitedDatetime is wrong. It should be using the last date per each product ID. – TEST MASTER Aug 24 '12 at 22:45
    
Fixed, the group by was outside the sub-query. Now I get consistent results, and you can see that 4mil records with your query takes 111 seconds on my system, but my method takes only 9 seconds. that is roughly a 12 fold increase in performance. – EastOfJupiter Aug 25 '12 at 0:57

On my notebook I'm seeing about 102,346 ms to generate the history, 5,120 ms for the first search and 643 ms for the second. OTOH, it's BOINCing Rosetta@Home flat out at the same time.

declare @HistoryRecordsPerProduct int = 400000

set nocount on

-- drop table #Product
-- drop table #History

-- Create the test tables.

create table #Product
  ( ProductId Int primary key not null, SKU VarChar(100) not null )

insert into #Product ( ProductId, SKU ) values
  ( 100, 'CUP100' ), ( 101, 'CUP101' ), ( 102, 'MUG102' )

create table #History 
  ( Id Int identity not null, ProductId Int not null, VisitedDatetime DateTime not null )
-- EDIT: Note the following index on both columns. 
create index History_Product_VisitedDateTime on #History ( ProductId, VisitedDateTime desc )

-- Populate the history table.
declare @Start as DateTime = GetDate()

while @HistoryRecordsPerProduct > 0
  begin
  insert into #History ( ProductId, VisitedDatetime ) values ( 100, DateAdd( minute, rand() * 100, GetDate() ) ) 
  insert into #History ( ProductId, VisitedDatetime ) values ( 101, DateAdd( minute, rand() * 100, GetDate() ) ) 
  insert into #History ( ProductId, VisitedDatetime ) values ( 102, DateAdd( minute, rand() * 100, GetDate() ) ) 
  set @HistoryRecordsPerProduct = @HistoryRecordsPerProduct - 1 
  end 

select DateDiff( ms, @Start, GetDate() ) as 'Elapsed History Generation (ms)'

-- Query the data.
set @Start = GetDate()
declare @End as DateTime = @Start + 10 -- Days.

select @Start as [Start], @End as [End]

select ProductId, SKU,
  ( select Max( VisitedDateTime ) from #History where ProductId = #Product.ProductId and
    @Start <= VisitedDatetime and VisitedDatetime <= @End ) as VDT
  from #Product

select DateDiff( ms, @Start, GetDate() ) as 'Elapsed Search (ms)'

-- And again with the data cached.

set @Start = GetDate()
set @End = @Start + 10 -- Days.

select @Start as [Start], @End as [End]

select ProductId, SKU,
  ( select Max( VisitedDateTime ) from #History where ProductId = #Product.ProductId and
    @Start <= VisitedDatetime and VisitedDatetime <= @End ) as VDT
  from #Product

select DateDiff( ms, @Start, GetDate() ) as 'Elapsed Search (ms)'
share|improve this answer
    
thanks Haba. I would give you a thumb up but i don't have enough reputation. The Max is the answer. Thank you. – TEST MASTER Aug 27 '12 at 16:27

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.