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I have 2 javascript files. Lets call it script1.js and script2.js. I want to make sure that they execute in order(script1.js first and then script2.js). So I set async attribute to false for both of them. However in a particular scenario this is not happening. If script1 contains a sync xhr call then the order of execution gets reversed and script2 gets executed first and then script1. I opened a bug against firefox but they said that sync xhr call spins the event loop again and hence even though first script is not finished yet it still starts executing the second script. There is no way I can avoid those sync xhr in a javascript file. Does anyone faced this issue before? Please let me know if there is any alternate way of doing this or anyway to ensure the javascript files execution order. This works as expected in chrome and it breaks only in firefox.

Here is the example where it can be tried.

Following is the javascript method which loads script1 and script2 in oder.

function loadJavascript() {
                var script1 = document.createElement("script");
                script1.async=false;
                script1.src = "/html/js/script1.js";
                script1.finished = false;
                script1.onload = script1.onreadystatechange = function() {
                    if ((script1.readyState && script1.readyState != "complete" && script1.readyState != "loaded") || script1.finished) return;
                    script1.onload = script1.onreadystatechange = null;
                    console.log("script1 finished executing");
                    script1.finished =true;
                };



var script2 = document.createElement("script");
            script2.async=false;
            script2.src = "/html/js/script2.js";
                script2.finished = false;
                script2.onload = script2.onreadystatechange = function() {
                    if ((script2.readyState && script2.readyState != "complete" && script2.readyState != "loaded") || script2.finished) return;
                    script2.onload = script2.onreadystatechange = null;
                    console.log("script2 finished executing");
                    script2.finished =true;
                };
                var head = document.head;
            head.appendChild(script1);
            head.appendChild(script2);
    }

script1.js

(function(){
    console.log("script1 evaluating");
    var http = new XMLHttpRequest();
    http.open('GET', '/html/js/script3.js', false);
    var data = http.send(null);
    eval(http.responseText); 
})();

script2.js

(function(){
    console.log("script2 evaluating");
})();

script3.js

(function(){
})();

Actual results:

First time the execution order was correct. I see following thing in firebug

script1 evaluating

GET http://10.194.176.9/html/js/script3.js

script1 finished executing

script2 evaluating

script2 finished executing

However second time onwards once all the scripts are cached I always see the following order. Here you will see the execution order of script2 and script1 is reversed.

script1 evaluating

GET http://10.194.176.9/html/js/script3.js

script2 evaluating

script2 finished executing

script1 finished executing

Expected results:

The execution order of script1 and script2 should not have reversed as I am using async=false.

share|improve this question
    
It is hard to understand what you're doing and asking. So are you trying to dynamically load two script synchronously (so one loads after the other) and do a synchronous ajax call in the first one that completes before the second script runs? –  jfriend00 Aug 24 '12 at 21:42
    
Yes you got it right. In my actual project I am using labjs to do that but for understanding purpose I simplified that a little and showed it here. –  Sameer Shah Aug 25 '12 at 0:14
    
I don't think async="false" is a widely supported syntax. The generally suported use is to just add async or async="true" which is the opposite of what you're trying to do. You must admit that synchronously loading dynamically added scripts is pretty unusual. –  jfriend00 Aug 25 '12 at 0:33
    
headjs and labjs are libraries created based on loading javascripts dynamically(means loading them in parallel and executing them in order).If you check the first line of headjs.com it says "Load scripts in parallel but execute in order".Thats how you can keep your site running fast. Just look inside any of this library (headjs and labjs) and you will find that they use the technique of inserting the script and setting async=false for browsers which supports it.For other browsers they use "text/cache" technique to download scripts up front. So this is not that unusual and chrome supports it. –  Sameer Shah Aug 25 '12 at 0:52
    
Read the articles I referenced in my modified answer. They speak to problems with async="false" in some browsers. –  jfriend00 Aug 25 '12 at 0:54

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