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I have a query that looks as such:

SELECT Distinct(ContKey)
FROM Point
WHERE Created > 1245750191000
  AND Created < 1345753791000
  AND ContainerId='abcd'

The purpose of the query is to get all the distinct ContKey values, which maps to a field "Key" in table "Container", based on some criteria, which includes a range.

It runs very slow. I'm convinced it's not an indexing issue, because we have an index on the relevant fields and combinations of fields. In my database with millions and millions of rows, this query takes 300 seconds to return 69,338 results. Too slow!

I'm trying to re-write the query to eliminate the DISTINCT clause. I came up with this:

SELECT Key
FROM Container t
WHERE t.ContainerId = 'abcd'
  AND EXISTS( SELECT 1
              FROM Point
              WHERE Created > 1245750191000
                AND Created < 1345753791000
                AND ContainerId = t.ContainerId )

It runs much faster (less than a second). But produces more results. 72,330 to be exactly. Is this re-write incorrect somehow? Based on what I'm trying to do, I'm hoping I can improve the query.

Thanks.

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1  
Don't forget to run ANALYZE from time to time: sqlite.org/lang_analyze.html –  biziclop Aug 24 '12 at 21:28
    
I tried running 'ANALYZE' and it locked everything up for a crazy long time and just died, probably because my db is so huge. –  KevinGreen24 Aug 27 '12 at 13:16
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1 Answer

I'm convinced it's not an indexing issue, because we have an index on the relevant fields and combinations of fields.

So in other words you're not sure what index you need so you just added indexes on everything you could think of? There are a lot of possible combinations when you consider all the various multi-column indexes and the permutations of the columns. Without understanding what you're doing, it's quite likely that you've not added the correct index.

You should put the most selective column first in the index. In this case it looks like ContainerId is probably the most selective. Try adding this multi-column index:

(ContainerId, CreatedId, ContKey)

Just to repeat: The column order in the index is important. Creating an index with the same columns in a different order is likely to give different performance characteristics.

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We have an index in that form. I need to know if the query syntax was correct. –  KevinGreen24 Aug 27 '12 at 13:16
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