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Some code

class Parent

  def print
    p "Hi I'm the parent"
  end
end

class Child < Parent

  def initialize(num)
    @num = num
  end

  def print
    child_print
  end

  def child_print
    if @num == 1 
      #call parent.print 
    else
      p "I'm the child"
    end 
  end
end

c1 = Child.new(1)
c2 = Child.new(2)
c1.print
c2.print

Child is an instance of Parent. Print is the method exposed in the interface, and both classes define them. Child decides to do other things in a (possibly really complex) method, but will invoke its parent's method under some condition.

I could just write

  def print
    if @num == 1 
      super
    else
      p "I'm the child"
    end 
  end

And that works, but what if it's not just a simple one-liner comparison but instead is doing lots of complicated things that deserve to be separated into another method? It may have to do some calculations before deciding that the parent's method should be called.

Or perhaps there is a different, better way to design it.

share|improve this question
    
I don't get the problem here. You can still call super (even in different branches and even multiple times) in a very complex method, too. –  Koraktor Aug 24 '12 at 22:11
    
child_print should call Parent's print. I think super just calls the method with the same name in the superclass. Or maybe I don't know how to use super properly. The reason why there is even a child_print is because I don't want to bloat the print method with things that aren't related to it, but is still required to determine whether to call the child's print or the parent's print. –  MxyL Aug 24 '12 at 22:17
    
Ah, sorry. It's already late here. ;) One moment. –  Koraktor Aug 24 '12 at 22:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted
Parent.instance_method(:print).bind(self).call

This is already pretty readable, but here's an explanation.

  1. Get the #print method of the Parent class
  2. Bind it to your current object
  3. Call it

PS: You can even give arguments to #call and they will be relayed to the called method.

PPS: That said, such code almost always hints at an issue in your class design. You should try to avoid it whenever possible.

share|improve this answer
    
I didn't like what I was trying to do either, but I am modifying someone else's class and they've provided their interface and class designs as such and I'm stuck with trying to work with it. Some cases I need to call the parent's method, other cases I run my own. Could be solved with a bloated method, but I don't like large methods.. –  MxyL Aug 24 '12 at 22:43

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