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ATTENTION: I CANNOT know if doSomething will remove the element or not. This is an exceptional case that my data structure needs to handle.

My problem is simples:

int size = list.size();
for(int i = 0; i < size; i++) {
   MyObj mo = list.get(i);
   mo.doSomething();
}

Now if doSomething() remove mo from the list, I eventually get an ArrayIndexOutOfBounds because the list has now shrunk.

What data structure should I use to allow iteration with the possibility of removing? I can NOT use an iterator here, in other words, I can NOT make doSomething return a boolean and call iterator.remove(). The data structure has to somehow handle the situation and continue to iterator through the rest of the elements still there.

EDIT: I CANNOT know if doSomething will remove the element or not. This is an exceptional case that my data structure needs to handle.

Part II => Making a smart listeners notifier to avoid code duplication everywhere

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Do you know whether doSomething() actually deleted mo? If so, just call --i afterwards and you'll be fine. –  Tomasz Nurkiewicz Aug 24 '12 at 22:11
    
@TomaszNurkiewicz That's the problem, Tomasz, I cannot know that so you solution does not work. :( –  chrisapotek Aug 24 '12 at 22:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can use an ArrayList, for example, as long as you update the index and size when something is removed.

List<MyObj> list = new ArrayList<MyObj>();
int size = list.size();
for(int i = 0; i < size; i++) {
    MyObj mo = list.get(i);
    mo.doSomething();
    if (size > list.size()) {
        size = list.size();
        i--;
    }
}

This only works if the item removed is the last one examined. For other changes to the list you will have to have more complicated logic.

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This does NOT work because I do NOT know if the element will be removed or not. See my edit in the question. –  chrisapotek Aug 24 '12 at 22:14
    
@chrisapotek: Ok, changed to check if something was removed. –  Keppil Aug 24 '12 at 22:16
    
Hummmm. Are you sure this works as long as the element removed is the current one being iterated? –  chrisapotek Aug 24 '12 at 22:17
    
@chrisapotek: With that condition, I'm sure, yes. –  Keppil Aug 24 '12 at 22:19
1  
@chrisapotek: When you remove an object the ones after are shifted down, so you need to check the same index again. –  Keppil Aug 24 '12 at 22:24

What data structure should I use to allow iteration with the possibility of removing?

The simplest option is to take a copy of the list and iterate over that instead:

List<MyObj> copy = new ArrayList<MyObj>(list);
for (MyObj mo : copy) {
    mo.doSomething();
}

Now it doesn't matter whether or not anything removes an idea from the original list - that won't change the copy of the list.

Another option is to use CopyOnWriteArrayList. You can then just iterate and remove or add items at will:

The "snapshot" style iterator method uses a reference to the state of the array at the point that the iterator was created. This array never changes during the lifetime of the iterator, so interference is impossible and the iterator is guaranteed not to throw ConcurrentModificationException. The iterator will not reflect additions, removals, or changes to the list since the iterator was created.

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Thanks Jon, but copying each time before iteration is too expensive. I guess @Keppil suggestion works better. –  chrisapotek Aug 24 '12 at 22:19
    
@chrisapotek: See my edit - CopyOnWriteArrayList may be a better fit. I'd personally be happier with that a solution which only works if the only change which is allowed is the removal of the current element. –  Jon Skeet Aug 24 '12 at 22:21
    
Thanks for CopyOnWriteArrayList class suggestion. –  Siddharth Jan 11 at 2:44

I think you should change you doSomething(). If mo.doSomething() can remove mo from l, you mo must know your l.

You can change the code like this:

Create a valid flag, inside of your MyObj. Only listen if valid.

while(list.hasNext()) {
   MyObj mo = list.next()
   if(mo.isValid()){
       mo.doSomething();
   } else {
       list.remove();
   }
}
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It does know... mo removes itself as a listener from the list and trouble arises... Why you think it sounds odd? –  chrisapotek Aug 24 '12 at 22:28
    
I know you wrote "not iterator" but I think thwas was because you mo removed itself from the list. –  Christian Kuetbach Aug 24 '12 at 22:43
    
This does not work. I only know if mo is valid or not after doSomething is executed... –  chrisapotek Aug 24 '12 at 22:47
    
This will work, but not in the first iteration. You will remove mo from the list at the second time you iterate through the list. This will lead to a list with invalid mo's. But you wrote performance is crucial. If there aren't that much item in thelist it may work. –  Christian Kuetbach Aug 24 '12 at 22:50

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